Courses for Fall 2017

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
ANCH 025-401 INTRO TO ANC NEAR EAST FRAME, GRANT CHEMISTRY BUILDING 514 MW 1000AM-1100AM A cultural history of Middle Eastern civilization from the invention of writing to the rise of Islam.
    History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
    ANCH 025-402 RECITATION FRAME, GRANT DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 2N36 R 1030AM-1130AM A cultural history of Middle Eastern civilization from the invention of writing to the rise of Islam.
      History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
      ANCH 025-403 RECITATION FRAME, GRANT WILLIAMS HALL 301 F 0900AM-1000AM A cultural history of Middle Eastern civilization from the invention of writing to the rise of Islam.
        History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
        ANCH 025-404 RECITATION FRAME, GRANT WILLIAMS HALL 301 F 1000AM-1100AM A cultural history of Middle Eastern civilization from the invention of writing to the rise of Islam.
          History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
          ANCH 026-401 ANCIENT GREECE MCINERNEY, JEREMY CLAIRE M. FAGIN HALL (NURSING AUD MW 1200PM-0100PM The Greeks enjoy a special place in the construction of western culture and identity, and yet many of us have only the vaguest notion of what their culture was like. A few Greek myths at bedtime when we are kids, maybe a Greek tragedy like Sophokles' Oidipous when we are at school: these are often the only contact we have with the world of the ancient Mediterranean. The story of the Greeks, however, deserves a wider audience, because so much of what we esteem in our own culture derives from them: democracy, epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, history writing, philosophy, aesthetic taste, all of these and many other features of cultural life enter the West from Greece. The oracle of Apollo at Delphi had inscribed over the temple, "Know Thyself." For us, that also means knowing the Greeks. We will cover the period from the Late Bronze Age, c. 1500 BC, down to the time of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the two hundred year interval from 600-400 BC.
            History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
            ANCH 026-402 RECITATION ROGERS, JORDAN WILLIAMS HALL 306 R 0900AM-1000AM The Greeks enjoy a special place in the construction of western culture and identity, and yet many of us have only the vaguest notion of what their culture was like. A few Greek myths at bedtime when we are kids, maybe a Greek tragedy like Sophokles' Oidipous when we are at school: these are often the only contact we have with the world of the ancient Mediterranean. The story of the Greeks, however, deserves a wider audience, because so much of what we esteem in our own culture derives from them: democracy, epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, history writing, philosophy, aesthetic taste, all of these and many other features of cultural life enter the West from Greece. The oracle of Apollo at Delphi had inscribed over the temple, "Know Thyself." For us, that also means knowing the Greeks. We will cover the period from the Late Bronze Age, c. 1500 BC, down to the time of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the two hundred year interval from 600-400 BC.
              History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
              ANCH 026-403 RECITATION ABBOTT, BENJAMIN WILLIAMS HALL 306 R 1000AM-1100AM The Greeks enjoy a special place in the construction of western culture and identity, and yet many of us have only the vaguest notion of what their culture was like. A few Greek myths at bedtime when we are kids, maybe a Greek tragedy like Sophokles' Oidipous when we are at school: these are often the only contact we have with the world of the ancient Mediterranean. The story of the Greeks, however, deserves a wider audience, because so much of what we esteem in our own culture derives from them: democracy, epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, history writing, philosophy, aesthetic taste, all of these and many other features of cultural life enter the West from Greece. The oracle of Apollo at Delphi had inscribed over the temple, "Know Thyself." For us, that also means knowing the Greeks. We will cover the period from the Late Bronze Age, c. 1500 BC, down to the time of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the two hundred year interval from 600-400 BC.
                History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                ANCH 026-406 RECITATION FORD, BRYN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 R 1100AM-1200PM The Greeks enjoy a special place in the construction of western culture and identity, and yet many of us have only the vaguest notion of what their culture was like. A few Greek myths at bedtime when we are kids, maybe a Greek tragedy like Sophokles' Oidipous when we are at school: these are often the only contact we have with the world of the ancient Mediterranean. The story of the Greeks, however, deserves a wider audience, because so much of what we esteem in our own culture derives from them: democracy, epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, history writing, philosophy, aesthetic taste, all of these and many other features of cultural life enter the West from Greece. The oracle of Apollo at Delphi had inscribed over the temple, "Know Thyself." For us, that also means knowing the Greeks. We will cover the period from the Late Bronze Age, c. 1500 BC, down to the time of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the two hundred year interval from 600-400 BC.
                  History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                  ANCH 026-407 RECITATION ROGERS, JORDAN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 R 1200PM-0100PM The Greeks enjoy a special place in the construction of western culture and identity, and yet many of us have only the vaguest notion of what their culture was like. A few Greek myths at bedtime when we are kids, maybe a Greek tragedy like Sophokles' Oidipous when we are at school: these are often the only contact we have with the world of the ancient Mediterranean. The story of the Greeks, however, deserves a wider audience, because so much of what we esteem in our own culture derives from them: democracy, epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, history writing, philosophy, aesthetic taste, all of these and many other features of cultural life enter the West from Greece. The oracle of Apollo at Delphi had inscribed over the temple, "Know Thyself." For us, that also means knowing the Greeks. We will cover the period from the Late Bronze Age, c. 1500 BC, down to the time of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the two hundred year interval from 600-400 BC.
                    History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                    ANCH 026-408 RECITATION FORD, BRYN DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 3C4 F 1000AM-1100AM The Greeks enjoy a special place in the construction of western culture and identity, and yet many of us have only the vaguest notion of what their culture was like. A few Greek myths at bedtime when we are kids, maybe a Greek tragedy like Sophokles' Oidipous when we are at school: these are often the only contact we have with the world of the ancient Mediterranean. The story of the Greeks, however, deserves a wider audience, because so much of what we esteem in our own culture derives from them: democracy, epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, history writing, philosophy, aesthetic taste, all of these and many other features of cultural life enter the West from Greece. The oracle of Apollo at Delphi had inscribed over the temple, "Know Thyself." For us, that also means knowing the Greeks. We will cover the period from the Late Bronze Age, c. 1500 BC, down to the time of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the two hundred year interval from 600-400 BC.
                      History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                      ANCH 026-409 RECITATION WARNOCK, TIMOTHY DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 3C4 F 1100AM-1200PM The Greeks enjoy a special place in the construction of western culture and identity, and yet many of us have only the vaguest notion of what their culture was like. A few Greek myths at bedtime when we are kids, maybe a Greek tragedy like Sophokles' Oidipous when we are at school: these are often the only contact we have with the world of the ancient Mediterranean. The story of the Greeks, however, deserves a wider audience, because so much of what we esteem in our own culture derives from them: democracy, epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, history writing, philosophy, aesthetic taste, all of these and many other features of cultural life enter the West from Greece. The oracle of Apollo at Delphi had inscribed over the temple, "Know Thyself." For us, that also means knowing the Greeks. We will cover the period from the Late Bronze Age, c. 1500 BC, down to the time of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the two hundred year interval from 600-400 BC.
                        History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                        ANCH 026-410 RECITATION WARNOCK, TIMOTHY DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 3C4 F 1200PM-0100PM The Greeks enjoy a special place in the construction of western culture and identity, and yet many of us have only the vaguest notion of what their culture was like. A few Greek myths at bedtime when we are kids, maybe a Greek tragedy like Sophokles' Oidipous when we are at school: these are often the only contact we have with the world of the ancient Mediterranean. The story of the Greeks, however, deserves a wider audience, because so much of what we esteem in our own culture derives from them: democracy, epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, history writing, philosophy, aesthetic taste, all of these and many other features of cultural life enter the West from Greece. The oracle of Apollo at Delphi had inscribed over the temple, "Know Thyself." For us, that also means knowing the Greeks. We will cover the period from the Late Bronze Age, c. 1500 BC, down to the time of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the two hundred year interval from 600-400 BC.
                          History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                          ANCH 026-411 RECITATION ABBOTT, BENJAMIN WILLIAMS HALL 307 F 1200PM-0100PM The Greeks enjoy a special place in the construction of western culture and identity, and yet many of us have only the vaguest notion of what their culture was like. A few Greek myths at bedtime when we are kids, maybe a Greek tragedy like Sophokles' Oidipous when we are at school: these are often the only contact we have with the world of the ancient Mediterranean. The story of the Greeks, however, deserves a wider audience, because so much of what we esteem in our own culture derives from them: democracy, epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, history writing, philosophy, aesthetic taste, all of these and many other features of cultural life enter the West from Greece. The oracle of Apollo at Delphi had inscribed over the temple, "Know Thyself." For us, that also means knowing the Greeks. We will cover the period from the Late Bronze Age, c. 1500 BC, down to the time of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the two hundred year interval from 600-400 BC.
                            History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                            ANCH 026-789 RECITATION The Greeks enjoy a special place in the construction of western culture and identity, and yet many of us have only the vaguest notion of what their culture was like. A few Greek myths at bedtime when we are kids, maybe a Greek tragedy like Sophokles' Oidipous when we are at school: these are often the only contact we have with the world of the ancient Mediterranean. The story of the Greeks, however, deserves a wider audience, because so much of what we esteem in our own culture derives from them: democracy, epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, history writing, philosophy, aesthetic taste, all of these and many other features of cultural life enter the West from Greece. The oracle of Apollo at Delphi had inscribed over the temple, "Know Thyself." For us, that also means knowing the Greeks. We will cover the period from the Late Bronze Age, c. 1500 BC, down to the time of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the two hundred year interval from 600-400 BC.
                              History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                              ANCH 133-401 THE HISTORY OF GOD WEITZMAN, STEVEN MCNEIL BUILDING 395 TR 0130PM-0300PM This course introduces the history of God as understood by modern scholars of religion. Why do people believe in gods in the first place? How is the God of the Old Testament different from earlier Near Eastern deities, or different from God as represented in the New Testament and the Quran? When and why did people come to question the existence of God, and how has the idea of God changed in the last century in light of experiences like the Holocaust, social movements like feminism, and the rise of new technologies like the Internet? The course will address these questions as it surveys the approaches scholars have developed to comprehend the history of a being who would seem beyond human comprehension.
                                ANCH 311-401 DISASTER ANC MED WORLD GREY, CAMPBELL
                                RISTVET, LAUREN
                                CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 493 TR 1030AM-1200PM Natural disasters occupy a powerful place in our imagination. Stories of floodsplagues, earthquakes and storms excite and horrify us, and communities mobilizetheir resources quickly in response to these events. In the ancient Mediterranean world, natural disasters could take on potent meaning, indicating the anger or disfavor of the gods, acting as warnings against certain courses of action, or confirmations of individuals' fears or suspicions about the world in which they lived. In this course, we explore the evidence for some disasters in the ancient Mediterranean world, the ways in which contemporaries reacted to those disasters and interpreted their causes. This project is, of necessity, multidisciplinary, involving textual, archaeological, geological, and comparative materials and drawing on methodologies from history, political and archaeological science, and the emerging field of disaster studies. In the process, we will gain an appreciation of the socialstructures of communities in the period, the thought-world in which they operated, and the challenges and opportunities thatattend a project of this sort. No prior knowledge of Ancient History is required, although it would be useful to have taken an introductory survey course. Texts will be discussed in translation.
                                  ANCH 611-401 GREEK EPIGRAPHY MCINERNEY, JEREMY CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 204 T 0200PM-0500PM An introduction to the principles and practices of Greek Epigraphy. Study of selected Greek inscriptions.
                                    FOR PHD STUDENTS ONLY
                                    CLST 005-401 PLATO'S REPUBLIC STRUCK, PETER CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 204 TR 1030AM-1200PM In classical Athens the question of how a government should work was an urgent one. They invented democracy, adopted it successfully for decades, and then it faced challenges, from oligarchs and others. At this time of tumult, the philosopher Plato set out to explore the question of the best form of government by framing it as a question of justice. Which mode of governing is the one that delivers justice? But to understand this question, a person first needs to understand what justice itself is. Coming up with an answer to this is a thorny and difficult prospect. By focusing on Platos Republic, this course aims to explore how best to govern a society, what kinds of qualities one should expect in a leader, and how these questions are connected to very basic understandings about human nature, society, and the world in general.
                                      FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
                                      CLST 026-401 ANCIENT GREECE MCINERNEY, JEREMY CLAIRE M. FAGIN HALL (NURSING AUD MW 1200PM-0100PM The Greeks enjoy a special place in the construction of western culture and identity, and yet many of us have only the vaguest notion of what their culture was like. A few Greek myths at bedtime when we are kids, maybe a Greek tragedy like Sophokles' Oidipous when we are at school: these are often the only contact we have with the world of the ancient Mediterranean. The story of the Greeks, however, deserves a wider audience, because so much of what we esteem in our own culture derives from them: democracy, epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, history writing, philosophy, aesthetic taste, all of these and many other features of cultural life enter the West from Greece. The oracle of Apollo at Delphi had inscribed over the temple, "Know Thyself." For us, that also means knowing the Greeks. We will cover the period from the Late Bronze Age, c. 1500 BC, down to the time of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the two hundred year interval from 600-400 BC.
                                        History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
                                        CLST 026-402 RECITATION ROGERS, JORDAN WILLIAMS HALL 306 R 0900AM-1000AM The Greeks enjoy a special place in the construction of western culture and identity, and yet many of us have only the vaguest notion of what their culture was like. A few Greek myths at bedtime when we are kids, maybe a Greek tragedy like Sophokles' Oidipous when we are at school: these are often the only contact we have with the world of the ancient Mediterranean. The story of the Greeks, however, deserves a wider audience, because so much of what we esteem in our own culture derives from them: democracy, epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, history writing, philosophy, aesthetic taste, all of these and many other features of cultural life enter the West from Greece. The oracle of Apollo at Delphi had inscribed over the temple, "Know Thyself." For us, that also means knowing the Greeks. We will cover the period from the Late Bronze Age, c. 1500 BC, down to the time of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the two hundred year interval from 600-400 BC.
                                          History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                          CLST 026-403 RECITATION ABBOTT, BENJAMIN WILLIAMS HALL 306 R 1000AM-1100AM The Greeks enjoy a special place in the construction of western culture and identity, and yet many of us have only the vaguest notion of what their culture was like. A few Greek myths at bedtime when we are kids, maybe a Greek tragedy like Sophokles' Oidipous when we are at school: these are often the only contact we have with the world of the ancient Mediterranean. The story of the Greeks, however, deserves a wider audience, because so much of what we esteem in our own culture derives from them: democracy, epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, history writing, philosophy, aesthetic taste, all of these and many other features of cultural life enter the West from Greece. The oracle of Apollo at Delphi had inscribed over the temple, "Know Thyself." For us, that also means knowing the Greeks. We will cover the period from the Late Bronze Age, c. 1500 BC, down to the time of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the two hundred year interval from 600-400 BC.
                                            History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                            CLST 026-406 RECITATION FORD, BRYN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 R 1100AM-1200PM The Greeks enjoy a special place in the construction of western culture and identity, and yet many of us have only the vaguest notion of what their culture was like. A few Greek myths at bedtime when we are kids, maybe a Greek tragedy like Sophokles' Oidipous when we are at school: these are often the only contact we have with the world of the ancient Mediterranean. The story of the Greeks, however, deserves a wider audience, because so much of what we esteem in our own culture derives from them: democracy, epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, history writing, philosophy, aesthetic taste, all of these and many other features of cultural life enter the West from Greece. The oracle of Apollo at Delphi had inscribed over the temple, "Know Thyself." For us, that also means knowing the Greeks. We will cover the period from the Late Bronze Age, c. 1500 BC, down to the time of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the two hundred year interval from 600-400 BC.
                                              History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                              CLST 026-407 RECITATION ROGERS, JORDAN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 R 1200PM-0100PM The Greeks enjoy a special place in the construction of western culture and identity, and yet many of us have only the vaguest notion of what their culture was like. A few Greek myths at bedtime when we are kids, maybe a Greek tragedy like Sophokles' Oidipous when we are at school: these are often the only contact we have with the world of the ancient Mediterranean. The story of the Greeks, however, deserves a wider audience, because so much of what we esteem in our own culture derives from them: democracy, epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, history writing, philosophy, aesthetic taste, all of these and many other features of cultural life enter the West from Greece. The oracle of Apollo at Delphi had inscribed over the temple, "Know Thyself." For us, that also means knowing the Greeks. We will cover the period from the Late Bronze Age, c. 1500 BC, down to the time of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the two hundred year interval from 600-400 BC.
                                                History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                CLST 026-408 RECITATION FORD, BRYN DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 3C4 F 1000AM-1100AM The Greeks enjoy a special place in the construction of western culture and identity, and yet many of us have only the vaguest notion of what their culture was like. A few Greek myths at bedtime when we are kids, maybe a Greek tragedy like Sophokles' Oidipous when we are at school: these are often the only contact we have with the world of the ancient Mediterranean. The story of the Greeks, however, deserves a wider audience, because so much of what we esteem in our own culture derives from them: democracy, epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, history writing, philosophy, aesthetic taste, all of these and many other features of cultural life enter the West from Greece. The oracle of Apollo at Delphi had inscribed over the temple, "Know Thyself." For us, that also means knowing the Greeks. We will cover the period from the Late Bronze Age, c. 1500 BC, down to the time of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the two hundred year interval from 600-400 BC.
                                                  History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                  CLST 026-409 RECITATION WARNOCK, TIMOTHY DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 3C4 F 1100AM-1200PM The Greeks enjoy a special place in the construction of western culture and identity, and yet many of us have only the vaguest notion of what their culture was like. A few Greek myths at bedtime when we are kids, maybe a Greek tragedy like Sophokles' Oidipous when we are at school: these are often the only contact we have with the world of the ancient Mediterranean. The story of the Greeks, however, deserves a wider audience, because so much of what we esteem in our own culture derives from them: democracy, epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, history writing, philosophy, aesthetic taste, all of these and many other features of cultural life enter the West from Greece. The oracle of Apollo at Delphi had inscribed over the temple, "Know Thyself." For us, that also means knowing the Greeks. We will cover the period from the Late Bronze Age, c. 1500 BC, down to the time of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the two hundred year interval from 600-400 BC.
                                                    History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                    CLST 026-410 RECITATION WARNOCK, TIMOTHY DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 3C4 F 1200PM-0100PM The Greeks enjoy a special place in the construction of western culture and identity, and yet many of us have only the vaguest notion of what their culture was like. A few Greek myths at bedtime when we are kids, maybe a Greek tragedy like Sophokles' Oidipous when we are at school: these are often the only contact we have with the world of the ancient Mediterranean. The story of the Greeks, however, deserves a wider audience, because so much of what we esteem in our own culture derives from them: democracy, epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, history writing, philosophy, aesthetic taste, all of these and many other features of cultural life enter the West from Greece. The oracle of Apollo at Delphi had inscribed over the temple, "Know Thyself." For us, that also means knowing the Greeks. We will cover the period from the Late Bronze Age, c. 1500 BC, down to the time of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the two hundred year interval from 600-400 BC.
                                                      History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                      CLST 026-411 RECITATION ABBOTT, BENJAMIN WILLIAMS HALL 307 F 1200PM-0100PM The Greeks enjoy a special place in the construction of western culture and identity, and yet many of us have only the vaguest notion of what their culture was like. A few Greek myths at bedtime when we are kids, maybe a Greek tragedy like Sophokles' Oidipous when we are at school: these are often the only contact we have with the world of the ancient Mediterranean. The story of the Greeks, however, deserves a wider audience, because so much of what we esteem in our own culture derives from them: democracy, epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, history writing, philosophy, aesthetic taste, all of these and many other features of cultural life enter the West from Greece. The oracle of Apollo at Delphi had inscribed over the temple, "Know Thyself." For us, that also means knowing the Greeks. We will cover the period from the Late Bronze Age, c. 1500 BC, down to the time of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the two hundred year interval from 600-400 BC.
                                                        History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                        CLST 029-301 ROME & AMERICA GREY, CAMPBELL NEW COLLEGE HOUSE 110 TR 0130PM-0300PM This course explores a range of social structures and contexts, cultural understandings and intellectual practices where the influence of Roman exemplars is discernible in both historical and present-day America. It presents students with Roman and American materials placed in explicit or implicit dialog with one another: e.g., descriptions and discussions of political processes and structures; attitudes towards games, public entertainments, and communal cohesion; rhetorics and vocabularies of public space. Among other tasks and projects, students will stage a 'reimagination' of the Constitutional (Philadelphia) Convention of 1787, which resulted in the United States Constitution. They will also emulate ancient moralists and satirists, who attacked Rome's 'Bread and Circuses' culture, by focusing their attention upon comparable practices in modern America.
                                                          FRESHMAN SEMINAR; CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
                                                          CLST 102-401 CLASSICAL TRADITIONS MURNAGHAN, SHEILA WILLIAMS HALL 205 TR 0300PM-0430PM A broad consideration of the ways in which writers and artists from the early modern era to the present day have responded to the classical tradition, borrowing from, imitating, questioning, and challenging their classical predecessors. Through modern reworkings of ancient epic, tragedy, biography, and lyric by authors ranging from Shakespeare and Racine to contemporary poets, painters, and filmmakers, we will ask what the terms "classical" and "tradition" might mean and will track the continuities and differences between antiquity and the modern world. Should we see ancient Greek and Roman culture as an inheritance, a valuable source of wealth bequeathed to the modern age? Or is there something wrong with that picture? How do ancient texts have to be adapted and transformed if they are to speak to modern conditions and concerns? This is an introductory-level course open to anyone who cares about the relationship between the present and the past.
                                                            Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR
                                                            CLST 103-401 HIST ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY MEYER, SUSAN STEPHEN A. LEVIN BUILDING 111 TR 0900AM-1030AM An introduction to the major philosophical thinkers and schools of ancient Greece and Rome (The Presocratics, Plato, Aristotle, Stoics, Epicureans, and Sceptics). Topics to be covered include: nature of the universe, the relation between knowledge and reality, and the nature of morality and the good life. We will also examine some of the ways in which non-philosophical writers (e.g., Homer, Hesiod, Aristophanes, and Thucydides) treat the issues discussed by the philosophers.
                                                              History & Tradition Sector (all classes) HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
                                                              CLST 111-401 Introduction to Mediterranean Archaeology BOWES, KIMBERLY FISHER-BENNETT HALL 419 MW 1000AM-1100AM The cultures of Greece and Rome, what we call classical antiquity, span over a thousand years of multicultural achievement in the Mediterranean. This course tells the story of what it was like to live in the complex societies of ancient Greece and Rome. This story is told principally using the art, architecture, pottery and coins produced by these societies. We will examine both the bold and sexy, and the small and humble, from the Parthenon to wooden huts, from the Aphrodite of Knidos to the bones of a fisherman named Peter.
                                                                History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                CLST 111-402 RECITATION FRENCH, EMILY WILLIAMS HALL 24 F 1000AM-1100AM The cultures of Greece and Rome, what we call classical antiquity, span over a thousand years of multicultural achievement in the Mediterranean. This course tells the story of what it was like to live in the complex societies of ancient Greece and Rome. This story is told principally using the art, architecture, pottery and coins produced by these societies. We will examine both the bold and sexy, and the small and humble, from the Parthenon to wooden huts, from the Aphrodite of Knidos to the bones of a fisherman named Peter.
                                                                  History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                  CLST 111-403 RECITATION BLASDEL, GAVIN WILLIAMS HALL 317 F 1100AM-1200PM The cultures of Greece and Rome, what we call classical antiquity, span over a thousand years of multicultural achievement in the Mediterranean. This course tells the story of what it was like to live in the complex societies of ancient Greece and Rome. This story is told principally using the art, architecture, pottery and coins produced by these societies. We will examine both the bold and sexy, and the small and humble, from the Parthenon to wooden huts, from the Aphrodite of Knidos to the bones of a fisherman named Peter.
                                                                    History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                    CLST 111-404 RECITATION FRENCH, EMILY WILLIAMS HALL 318 R 1000AM-1100AM The cultures of Greece and Rome, what we call classical antiquity, span over a thousand years of multicultural achievement in the Mediterranean. This course tells the story of what it was like to live in the complex societies of ancient Greece and Rome. This story is told principally using the art, architecture, pottery and coins produced by these societies. We will examine both the bold and sexy, and the small and humble, from the Parthenon to wooden huts, from the Aphrodite of Knidos to the bones of a fisherman named Peter.
                                                                      History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                      CLST 111-405 RECITATION BLASDEL, GAVIN WILLIAMS HALL 201 F 0100PM-0200PM The cultures of Greece and Rome, what we call classical antiquity, span over a thousand years of multicultural achievement in the Mediterranean. This course tells the story of what it was like to live in the complex societies of ancient Greece and Rome. This story is told principally using the art, architecture, pottery and coins produced by these societies. We will examine both the bold and sexy, and the small and humble, from the Parthenon to wooden huts, from the Aphrodite of Knidos to the bones of a fisherman named Peter.
                                                                        History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                        CLST 127-401 MATERIAL PAST DIG WORLD COBB, PETER UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 TR 0300PM-0430PM The material remains of the human past -objects and spaces- provide tangible evidence of past people's lives. Today's information technologies improve our ability to document, study, and present these materials. But what does it mean to deal with material evidence in a virtual context? In this class, students will learn basic digital methods for studying the past while working with objects, including those in the collections of the Penn Museum. This class will teach relational database design and 3D object modeling. As we learn about acquiring and managing data, we will gain valuable experience in the evaluation and use of digital tools. The digital humanities are a platform both for learning the basic digital literacy students need to succeed in today's world and for discussing the human consequences of these new technologies and data. We will discuss information technology's impact on the study and presentation of the past, including topics such as public participation in archaeological projects, educational technologies in museum galleries, and the issues raised by digitizing and disseminating historic texts and objects. Finally, we will touch on technology's role in the preservation of the past in today's turbulent world. No prior technical experience is required, but we hope students will share an enthusiasm for the past.
                                                                          CLST 148-401 FOOD AND FIRE MOORE, KATHERINE UNIVERSITY MUSEUM WDNR MW 0100PM-0200PM This course will let students explore the essential heritage of human technology through archaeology. People have been transforming their environment from the first use of fire for cooking. Since then, humans have adapted to the world they created using the resources around them. We use artifacts to understand how the archaeological record can be used to trace breakthroughs such as breaking stone and bone, baking bread, weaving cloth and firing pottery and metals. The seminar will meet in the Penn Museum's new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials. Students will become familiar with the Museum's collections and the scientific methods used to study different materials. Class sessions will include discussions, guest presentations, museum field trips, and hands-on experience in the laboratory.
                                                                            Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
                                                                            CLST 148-402 RECITATION REAMER, JUSTIN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 R 1200PM-0100PM This course will let students explore the essential heritage of human technology through archaeology. People have been transforming their environment from the first use of fire for cooking. Since then, humans have adapted to the world they created using the resources around them. We use artifacts to understand how the archaeological record can be used to trace breakthroughs such as breaking stone and bone, baking bread, weaving cloth and firing pottery and metals. The seminar will meet in the Penn Museum's new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials. Students will become familiar with the Museum's collections and the scientific methods used to study different materials. Class sessions will include discussions, guest presentations, museum field trips, and hands-on experience in the laboratory.
                                                                              Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                              CLST 148-403 RECITATION REAMER, JUSTIN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 R 0100PM-0200PM This course will let students explore the essential heritage of human technology through archaeology. People have been transforming their environment from the first use of fire for cooking. Since then, humans have adapted to the world they created using the resources around them. We use artifacts to understand how the archaeological record can be used to trace breakthroughs such as breaking stone and bone, baking bread, weaving cloth and firing pottery and metals. The seminar will meet in the Penn Museum's new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials. Students will become familiar with the Museum's collections and the scientific methods used to study different materials. Class sessions will include discussions, guest presentations, museum field trips, and hands-on experience in the laboratory.
                                                                                Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                CLST 148-404 RECITATION REAMER, JUSTIN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 F 1200PM-0100PM This course will let students explore the essential heritage of human technology through archaeology. People have been transforming their environment from the first use of fire for cooking. Since then, humans have adapted to the world they created using the resources around them. We use artifacts to understand how the archaeological record can be used to trace breakthroughs such as breaking stone and bone, baking bread, weaving cloth and firing pottery and metals. The seminar will meet in the Penn Museum's new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials. Students will become familiar with the Museum's collections and the scientific methods used to study different materials. Class sessions will include discussions, guest presentations, museum field trips, and hands-on experience in the laboratory.
                                                                                  Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                  CLST 148-405 RECITATION REAMER, JUSTIN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 F 0100PM-0200PM This course will let students explore the essential heritage of human technology through archaeology. People have been transforming their environment from the first use of fire for cooking. Since then, humans have adapted to the world they created using the resources around them. We use artifacts to understand how the archaeological record can be used to trace breakthroughs such as breaking stone and bone, baking bread, weaving cloth and firing pottery and metals. The seminar will meet in the Penn Museum's new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials. Students will become familiar with the Museum's collections and the scientific methods used to study different materials. Class sessions will include discussions, guest presentations, museum field trips, and hands-on experience in the laboratory.
                                                                                    Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                    CLST 221-401 HELL & ROM ART/ARTIFACT KUTTNER, ANN JAFFE BUILDING B17 TR 1030AM-1200PM An intensive introduction to the art and architecture of Rome and her empire from Republican and later Hellenistic to Constantinian times. Variable emphasis on topics ranging from major genres, styles, and programs of commemorative and decorative art, historical narrative, and political iconography to building types and functions and the specific Etrusco-Roman notion of space, land division, and city planning.
                                                                                      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                      CLST 227-301 AGE OF CAESAR DAMON, CYNTHIA CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 237 MW 0330PM-0500PM A course on Roman culture and society in a period of tumultuous political change, the lifetime of Julius Caesar (100-44BCE). Focuses on the interplay between shifting political and military realities and developments in social organization and literary production at Rome and in the wider Mediterranean world. The reception of Caesar in later ages will also be considered. Readings (all in translation) will include Catullus, Cicero, Lucretius, Plutarach, Sallust, Suetonius, and, of course, Caesar himself.
                                                                                        CLST 244-401 THE MATERIAL WORLD IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SCIENCE BOILEAU, MARIE-CLAUDE
                                                                                        JANSEN, JAN
                                                                                        DIBBLE, HAROLD
                                                                                        UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 TR 1030AM-1200PM By focusing on the scientific analysis of inorganic archaeological materials, this course will explore processes of creation in the past. clst 244 will take place in the new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and will be team taught in three modules: analysis of lithics, analysis of ceramics and analysis of metals. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how the transformation of materials into objects provides key information about past human behaviors and the socio-economic contexts of production, distribution, exchange and use. Discussion topics will include invention and adoption of new technologies, change and innovation, use of fire, and craft specialization.
                                                                                          CLST 271-401 GREEK & ROMAN MEDICINE ROSEN, RALPH CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 237 TR 1030AM-1200PM The history of Western medicine is remarkably recent; until the nineteenth century prevailing theories of the body and mind, and many therapeutic methods to combat disease, were largely informed by an elaborate system developed centuries earlier in ancient Greece, at a period when the lines between philosophy, medicine, and what we might consider magic, were much less clearly defined than they are today. This course will examine the ways in which the Greeks, and then the Romans, conceptualized the body, disease, and healing, and will compare these to medical culture of our time. We will consider sources from Hippocrates, Plato, and Aristotle to Galen and Soranus, and will juxtapose these writings with modern discourse about similar topics. We will also pay some attention to ancient pharmacology and religious healing, and will visit the Penn Museum to see their collection of ancient medical instruments. All readings will be in English and no previous background in Classical Studies is required. This course will be especially appealing (and useful) to Pre-med and Nursing students, and to students interested in the History of Science, Ancient Philosophy, and Classics.
                                                                                            CLST 274-401 INTRO ROMAN ARCHAEOLOGY BOWES, KIMBERLY UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 419 MW 0200PM-0330PM This course provides and introduction to the art and archaeology of the ancient Roman world. From Britain to Africa, from monuments like the Colosseum to the burned remains of ancient meals, we'll consider the full spectrum of Roman material culture, exploring at the same time how archaeologists reconstruct the past. This course will make frequent use of the collections of the Penn Museum.
                                                                                              CLST 311-401 DISASTER ANC MED WORLD GREY, CAMPBELL
                                                                                              RISTVET, LAUREN
                                                                                              CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 493 TR 1030AM-1200PM
                                                                                                CLST 335-301 THE ETRUSCANS TURFA, JEAN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 345 TR 0130PM-0300PM The Etruscans, who spoke a language unlike any others known, were cast by their Greek and Roman rivals as outsiders and enemies: pirates, lovers of luxury, loose women. Today we must rely on the archaeological evidence of painted tombs, decorated Tuscan temples and massive engineering works to correct the picture. The course will survey a millennium (1st millennium BCE) of Etruscan culture through archaeological sites, shipwrecks and trading posts, works of art and everyday material culture, including the landscape and built environment, technology, seafaring and war, womens world, and the unique religion for which Etruria was famous, ending with a surprising array of examples of Etruscan heritage embraced by society from the time of Augustus to the present day.
                                                                                                  CLST 341-401 TOPICS MEDITERRANEAN ART: Arts of the Roman House, Villa and Palace KUTTNER, ANN JAFFE BUILDING 113 W 0200PM-0500PM
                                                                                                    CLST 360-401 TPCS: CLASSICISM & LIT: Classical Epic and Medieval Romance COPELAND, RITA FISHER-BENNETT HALL 244 MW 0330PM-0500PM In this course on ancient and medieval epic we will track the literary compulsion to return to the Trojan War. The matter of Troy provided ancient and medieval writers with a rich resource for reflections on war and violence, on the power and vulnerability of states, on personal and communal suffering, and on how history is written. We will begin with the Homeric Iliad along with other ancient Greek uses of the Trojan myth; we will read Virgils refashioning of the Trojan story as the new beginnings of a triumphant Roman history; and then we will consider how medieval writers, including Geoffrey of Monmouth, Boccaccio, Chaucer, the Gawain-Poet, and Robert Henryson, shaped and contended with the myth of Troy. In the hands of late medieval writers, Troy becomes a literary site for the transformation of epic into the genre of romance. The course requirements will be: one ten-minute oral presentation on a research topic of your choice related to the reading, together with a short write-up of your research; one very short critical paper; and one longer research paper (which can develop the subject of your oral presentation).
                                                                                                      CLST 370-301 Classics & American Government MULHERN, JOHN CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 237 MW 0200PM-0330PM Before the universities established public-service programs in the twentieth century, many Americans prepared themselves for public life by studying Greek and Latin authors in school and college. In this course, using English translations, students survey an eighteenth-century classical curriculum and trace its influence in the political activity of Madison and others who guided the development of American governmental institutions.
                                                                                                        BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                                                                                        CLST 402-601 POST BACC:GREEK NISHIMURA-JENSEN, JULIE CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 237 MWF 1100AM-1200PM Intensive Greek reading course for students in the Postbac program.
                                                                                                          CLST 403-601 POST BACC LATIN KER, JAMES CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 237 MWF 0100PM-0200PM Advanced study in Latin for students enrolled in the Post-Baccalaureate Program in Classical Studies. Permission of the instructor required.
                                                                                                            CLST 500-301 MATERIALS AND METHODS DAMON, CYNTHIA CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 337 F 0900AM-1200PM This is the required proseminar for first year graduate students in classical and ancient history. It will introduce you to some key methodological, practical and theoretical tools for beginning a scholarly career in these fields.
                                                                                                              CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                              CLST 511-401 HISTORY LIT THEORY KAZANJIAN, DAVID VAN PELT LIBRARY 302 T 0600PM-0900PM This course is an introduction to literary and cultural theory and to some o the key problems of questions that animate theoretical discussion among literary scholars today. These include questions about aesthetics and cultural value, about ideology and hegemony, about the patriarchal and colonial bases of Western culture, and about the status of the cultural object, the cultural critic, and cultural theory itself.
                                                                                                                UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                CLST 526-401 MAT & METHODS MED ARCH TARTARON, THOMAS CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 237 F 0200PM-0500PM This course is intended to familiarize new graduate students with the collections of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology and the wide range of scholarly interests and approaches used by faculty at Penn and neighboring institutions, as well as to provide an introduction to archaeological methods and theory in a Mediterranean context. Each week, invited lecturers will address the class on different aspects of archaeological methodology in their own research, emphasizing specific themes that will be highlighted in readings and subsequent discussion. The course is divided into five sections: Introduction to the Mediterranean Section; Collections; Method and Theory in Mediterranean Archaeology; Museum Work; and Ethics. The course is designed for new AAMW graduate students, though other graduate students or advanced undergraduate students may participate with the permission of the instructor.
                                                                                                                  UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                  CLST 543-401 ARCHAEOBOTANY SEMINAR WHITE, CHANTEL UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 MW 0900AM-1030AM
                                                                                                                    CLST 598-301 LANGUAGE PEDAGOGY WRKSHP KER, JAMES CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 237 TR 1200PM-0130PM The Workshop is intended to serve as a forum for first-time teachers of Latin or Greek. This will include discussing course-plans and pedagogical theories and strategies, collaborating on course materials, and addressing any concerns in the language courses presently being taught.
                                                                                                                      FOR MASTER STUDENTS ONLY
                                                                                                                      CLST 611-401 GREEK EPIGRAPHY MCINERNEY, JEREMY CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 204 T 0200PM-0500PM Scholars have long debated the nature of the ancient economy, the terms in which it can best be approached, and the decision-making processes that underpinned economic behavior in antiquity. In particular, controversy has surrounded the extent to which the economies of Greco-Roman antiquity can be modeled using contemporary tools of analysis. In recent scholarship, many of the tenets laid down by Moses Finley in his "Ancient Economy" have been re-evaluated, with the result that the field is currently in a state of intellectual ferment. It is the purpose of this course to explore the terms in which contemporary debates over ancient economic systems are formulated, with reference to a variety of societies and periods, from the palace economies of the Mycenaean period to the system of taxation introduced in the early fourth century by the emperor Diocletian and his colleagues in the Tetrarchy.
                                                                                                                        FOR PHD STUDENTS ONLY
                                                                                                                        CLST 614-401 Topics in Aegean Bronze Age: Depictions of Men and Women in Frescoes SHANK, ELIZABETH JAFFE BUILDING 113 M 0200PM-0500PM Depictions of men and women in Aegean Bronze Age art, dating to circa 3,000-1,100 BCE, are extremely evocative. In this class we will examine what fresco art can tell us about the roles of men and women in this prehistoric culture. We will keep several questions in mind: 1) How do images of men and women evolve? 2) Does the artwork available to us allow us to safely draw conclusions about Minoan and Mycenaean society? 3) What are the similarities and differences between the depictions of Minoan and Mycenaean men and women? 4) Can we make a case that certain people were viewed as different (elevated in society, perhaps on a religious or secular level) based on the artistic examples that have been uncovered? We will also study theories that have been proposed about the roles of men and women of the Aegean Bronze Age, a people known for their artistic excellence and ambiguous images. Class discussions will be based on assigned readings, and you will write 3 short papers reviewing assigned articles. Students will also write and present two research papers to the class.
                                                                                                                          CLST 628-401 MEDIEVAL POETICS COPELAND, RITA CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 204 R 0600PM-0900PM This is a comparative course on medieval stylistic practices, formal innovations, and especially theories of form. Our common ground will be the theories that were generated in learned and pedagogical traditions of medieval Latinity (with their roots in ancient thought about poetic form). We will also collaborate on the particulars of the European vernacular cultures that stamped their interests on the interplay of language, genre, and form. Questions common to all the literary traditions may be the social, ethical, and epistemological roles of poetry. Other common questions include the distinctively medieval terms of interpretive theory and practice; technologies of interpretation; theories of fiction (fabula); the histories of the language arts; transformations of the terminology of figurative language; grammatical orthopraxis and permitted deviation; and material texts. As we turn from interpretive to generative categories, we will consider how arts of poetry find their linguistic and stylistic focus in the vocabularies of individual vernacular traditions.
                                                                                                                            CLST 711-401 The Archaeology of Greece & Asia Minor in the Archaic and Classical Period ROSE, CHARLES WILLIAMS HALL 3 M 0130PM-0430PM An examination of new discoveries and conflicting interpretations in the archaeology of Greece and Asia Minor between the seventh and fourth centuries B.C.E. Both sides of the Aegean will receive equal attention, and emphasis will be placed on sanctuaries, settlements, and cemeteries.
                                                                                                                              FOR PHD STUDENTS ONLY
                                                                                                                              GREK 017-680 INTERMED MODERN GREEK I TSEKOURA, DIMITRA WILLIAMS HALL 319 MW 0500PM-0630PM This course is designed for students with an elementary knowledge of Demotic Modern Greek, and aims mainly at developing oral expression, reading and writing skills.
                                                                                                                                GREK 101-301 ELEM CLASSICAL GREEK I NISHIMURA-JENSEN, JULIE CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 204 MWF 0100PM-0200PM Intensive introduction to Classical Greek morphology and syntax. This course includes exercises in grammar, Greek composition, and translation from Greek to English. Emphasis is placed upon developing the ability to read Greek with facility.
                                                                                                                                  LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                  GREK 115-680 GREEK/HERITAGE SPKRS I TSEKOURA, DIMITRA WILLIAMS HALL 705 TR 0430PM-0600PM This course is intended to help Heritage Speakers or student with prior knowledge of conversational modern Greek (or even Ancient Greek) to refresh or enrich their knowledge of modern Greek and who would not be a good fit for the elementary or intermediate classes. A theme based textbook and instructions along with a comprehensive overview of grammar as a whole is presented while original text, songs, video and other media are used in order to augment vocabulary and increase fluency in modern Greek. Students are expected to properly use the language, do theme-based research on the themes examined and provide written work on various subjects and make conversation in class. Presentations on researched topics account for final exam.
                                                                                                                                    PRIOR LANGUAGE EXPERIENCE REQUIRED; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE FIRST TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                    GREK 203-301 INTERMED GREEK: PROSE MORTON, JACOB CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 204 TR 1200PM-0120PM This course is for those who have completed Ancient Greek 102, Greek 112 or equivalent. You are now ready to begin reading real Greek! We will read a selection of passages from Greek prose authors, focusing on language and style.
                                                                                                                                      LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                      GREK 309-301 TOPICS: GREEK LITERATURE: HERODOTUS MURNAGHAN, SHEILA CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203 TR 1200PM-0130PM Close reading and discussion of a Greek author or a particular genre of Greek literature. Topics will vary each semester, and the course may be repeated for credit.
                                                                                                                                        GREK 609-301 GRADUATE SEMINAR: GREEK AESTHETIC THEORY ROSEN, RALPH VAN PELT LIBRARY 629 W 0200PM-0500PM This seminar will explore ancient Greek (and some Roman) approaches to the arts. Greek audiences and critics alike were deeply interested in both theoretical and practical questions about the arts, especially literature. We will consider not only the philosophical tradition, but also popular notions of aesthetic value, including the varieties of audience responses and fandom. Among the authors we will study are various early Greek philosophical and sophistic thinkers, Plato, Aristotle, Hellenistic literary theorists, including Philodemus, Horace, Longinus, and selected theorists of late antiquity.
                                                                                                                                          FOR PHD STUDENTS ONLY
                                                                                                                                          GREK 611-401 GREEK EPIGRAPHY MCINERNEY, JEREMY CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 204 T 0200PM-0500PM An introduction to the principles and practices of Greek Epigraphy. Study of selected Greek inscriptions.
                                                                                                                                            FOR PHD STUDENTS ONLY
                                                                                                                                            LATN 101-301 ELEMENTARY LATIN I KAISER, JOHANNA
                                                                                                                                            KER, JAMES
                                                                                                                                            CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203 MWF 1000AM-1100AM An introduction to the Latin language for beginners. Students begin learning grammar and vocabulary, with practical exercises in reading in writing. By the end of the course students will be able to read and analyze simple Latin texts, including selected Roman inscriptions in the Penn Museum.
                                                                                                                                              LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                              LATN 101-302 ELEMENTARY LATIN I SIMONS, JULIA
                                                                                                                                              KER, JAMES
                                                                                                                                              CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 493 MWF 1100AM-1200PM An introduction to the Latin language for beginners. Students begin learning grammar and vocabulary, with practical exercises in reading in writing. By the end of the course students will be able to read and analyze simple Latin texts, including selected Roman inscriptions in the Penn Museum.
                                                                                                                                                LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                LATN 101-601 ELEMENTARY LATIN I REINHARDT, ISABELLA WILLIAMS HALL 315 TR 0630PM-0815PM An introduction to the Latin language for beginners. Students begin learning grammar and vocabulary, with practical exercises in reading in writing. By the end of the course students will be able to read and analyze simple Latin texts, including selected Roman inscriptions in the Penn Museum.
                                                                                                                                                  LATN 203-301 INTERMED LATIN: PROSE HANSON, WESLEY CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 237 MWF 1000AM-1100AM Prerequisite(s): LATN 102 or equivalent (such as placement score of 550). Introduction to continuous reading of unadapted works by Latin authors in prose(e.g., Cornelius Nepos, Cicero, Pliny), in combination with a thorough review of Latin grammar. By the end of the course students will have thorough familiarity with the grammar, vocabulary, and style of the selected authors, will be able to tackle previously unseen passages by them, and will be able to discuss questions of language and interpretation.
                                                                                                                                                    LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                    LATN 203-302 INTERMED LATIN: PROSE BENSCH-SCHAUS, AMELIA FISHER-BENNETT HALL 323 MWF 1100AM-1200PM Prerequisite(s): LATN 102 or equivalent (such as placement score of 550). Introduction to continuous reading of unadapted works by Latin authors in prose(e.g., Cornelius Nepos, Cicero, Pliny), in combination with a thorough review of Latin grammar. By the end of the course students will have thorough familiarity with the grammar, vocabulary, and style of the selected authors, will be able to tackle previously unseen passages by them, and will be able to discuss questions of language and interpretation.
                                                                                                                                                      LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                      LATN 203-601 INTERMED LATIN: PROSE TRAWEEK, ALISON WILLIAMS HALL 202 MW 0430PM-0600PM Prerequisite(s): LATN 102 or equivalent (such as placement score of 550). Introduction to continuous reading of unadapted works by Latin authors in prose(e.g., Cornelius Nepos, Cicero, Pliny), in combination with a thorough review of Latin grammar. By the end of the course students will have thorough familiarity with the grammar, vocabulary, and style of the selected authors, will be able to tackle previously unseen passages by them, and will be able to discuss questions of language and interpretation.
                                                                                                                                                        LATN 309-301 TOPICS: LATIN LITERATURE: THE LATIN NOVEL KER, JAMES CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 392 TR 0130PM-0300PM This course is for those who have completed Latin 204, Latin 212, or equivalent (such as placement score of 650, or AP score of 4 or 5). Close reading and discussion of a Latin author or a particular genre of latin literature. Topics will vary each semester, and the course may be repeated for credit. Assignments will include syntactic and literary analysis on a daily basis, a midterm, a paper, and a final exam. We will read in Latin substantial portions of the three books of Caesar's Civil War and the ten books of Lucans, and the entirety of both works in English. Both authors treat the first phase of the civil war that finally destroyed the Roman Republic, the contest between Caesar and Pompey for supremacy at Rome. This phase ended at the battle of Pharsalus in August of 48 BCE. Caesar wrote his narrative shortly after the wars end and before its effects were fully felt, Lucan wrote his epic poem roughly a century later from the perspective of the principate established in its essentials by Caesar's heir, Augustus. Although the narratives cover the same events, the two authors' literary and political aims, as well as their historical contexts, produced wildly divergent stories. We will read them in tandem.
                                                                                                                                                          LATN 540-301 The Latin Text: A digital critical edition of the Bellum Alexandrinum DAMON, CYNTHIA CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203 TR 1030AM-1200PM What do we need to read texts in Latin? In these courses we read just one prose text and one poetic text, or a very limited number of texts and passages, with a focus on language and formal analysis (such as diction, grammar, stylistics, metrics, rhetoric, textual criticism). A range of exercises will be used to develop this, including composition, lexical studies, recitation, memorization, exegesis, written close-readings, and sight-translation.
                                                                                                                                                            LATN 600-301 Julio-Claudian Literature FARRELL JR, JOSEPH MEYERSON HALL B6 M 0200PM-0500PM This seminar focuses on the everyday (or quotidian), as well as related concepts such as social realism, as these are represented or evidenced in Roman literature. How do we identify and trace the everyday? What are its aesthetic, ethical, cultural modalities? What opportunities and problems does "everyday life" pose as a heuristic category? The assigned readings will primarily be case-studies in Latin literature, but social theory will be a central concern throughout, and participants are welcome to develop projects focused on historical and material culture.