Courses for Spring 2017

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
ANCH 027-050 ROME The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
    History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; STUDY ABROAD
    ANCH 027-051 HISTORY OF ANCIENT ROME The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
      History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; STUDY ABROAD
      ANCH 027-401 ANCIENT ROME GREY, CAMPBELL CLAUDIA COHEN HALL G17 MW 1200PM-0100PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
        History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
        ANCH 027-402 RECITATION SUSALLA, CYNTHIA DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 2N36 R 0900AM-1000AM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
          History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
          ANCH 027-403 RECITATION SUSALLA, CYNTHIA DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 2N36 R 1030AM-1130AM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
            History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
            ANCH 027-404 RECITATION BLASDEL, GAVIN DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 3C2 R 1100AM-1200PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
              History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
              ANCH 027-405 RECITATION FORD, BRYN MEYERSON HALL B7 R 1200PM-0100PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                ANCH 027-406 RECITATION PILIPOW, RYAN WILLIAMS HALL 2 F 1000AM-1100AM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                  History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                  ANCH 027-407 RECITATION FORD, BRYN CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203 F 0900AM-1000AM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                    History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                    ANCH 027-409 RECITATION ROGERS, JORDAN JAFFE BUILDING B17 F 1100AM-1200PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                      History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                      ANCH 027-410 RECITATION ROGERS, JORDAN WILLIAMS HALL 319 F 1200PM-0100PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                        History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                        ANCH 027-412 RECITATION PILIPOW, RYAN WILLIAMS HALL 321 F 1200PM-0100PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                          History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                          ANCH 027-413 RECITATION BLASDEL, GAVIN WILLIAMS HALL 318 F 0900AM-1000AM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                            History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                            ANCH 046-401 MYTHS & RELIG ANC WORLD FRAME, GRANT STITELER HALL B21 MW 0330PM-0500PM This course will survey the religions of the ancient Middle East, situating each in its historical and socio-cultural context and focusing on the key issues of concern to humanity: creation, birth, the place of humans in the order of the universe, death, and destruction. The course will cover not only the better-known cultures from the area, such as Egypt and Mesopotamia, but also some lesser-known traditions, such as those of the Hurrians, or of the ancient Mediterranean town of Ugarit. Religion will not be viewed merely as a separate, sealed-off element of the ancient societies, but rather as an element in various cultural contexts, for example, the relationship between religion and magic and the role of religion in politics will be recurring topics in the survey. Background readings for the lectures will be drawn not only from the modern scholarly literature, but also from the words of the ancients themselves in the form of their myths, rituals, and liturgies.
                              History & Tradition Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                              ANCH 119-401 AUGUSTAN CULTRL REVOL FARRELL JR, JOSEPH
                              ROSE, CHARLES
                              CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 204 TR 1200PM-0130PM The career of the man who was born Gaius Octavius and who died as the Emperor Augustus spanned the death of the Roman Republic, a protracted period of shared dictatorship and intermittent civil war. It ended with the concentration of power in the hands of one man and the foundation of a long-lasting hereditary monarchy. Over the course of this career, Octavius/Augustus transformed himself several times and oversaw the metamorphosis of the Roman state. Increasingly, historians have come to focus not only on the military, political, legal, and administrative reforms that made this transformation possible, but on the revolutionary cultural changes that supported measures and made the new order acceptable to Romans at different levels of society. This course considers these factors along with the idea of cultural revolution as a model of historical and archaeological analysis, particularly as concerns the role of the "great man" in bringing about such a revolution"
                                ANCH 209-401 ROMAN EMPIRE GREY, CAMPBELL CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203 MW 0330PM-0500PM "They create a desert and call it peace," wrote Tacitus in describing the response of the conquered to Rome's power, but the Roman Peace also brought with it it other, less dramatic changes. In this class we will break the Roman Empire down into a series of vignettes, using literature and archaeology to supply us us with the material for a fresh look at Roman society. Our aim is to uncover the complexity of Roman society, and to acknowledge the multiple voices that together made up the ancient Mediterranean world. We will focus upon key structural aspects of Roman society and culture, but explore them in new ways, using texts that highlight dissent, conflict and tension as they indicate cohesion and Rome's hegemony over the Mediterranean in antiquity. Texts will be read in translation. No prerequisites, although students are encouraged to take this course after taking ANCH 027/HIST 027.
                                  ANCH 298-050 EUROPEAN HISTORY, 776 BC - AD 69
                                    STUDY ABROAD
                                    ANCH 298-051 EUROPEAN HISTORY 31 BC - 900 AD
                                      STUDY ABROAD
                                      ANCH 298-052 ALEXANDER THE GREAT
                                        STUDY ABROAD
                                        ANCH 303-401 POWER & PERIL: THE PARADOX OF MONARCHY AMONG ANCIENT GREEKS, ROMANS & JEWS DOHRMANN, NATALIE
                                        WILKER, JULIA
                                        WILLIAMS HALL 3 MW 0330PM-0500PM We imagine Ancient Greece and Rome as the cradles of democracy and republicanism, the early Judea as pious theocracy, but the evidence tells us that monarchy was the most common and prevalent form of government in antiquity (and the premodern world in general). Despite their ubiquity, the King was a polarizing figurein reality and in conception. On the one hand, some idealized the monarchy as the ideal leader, and monarchy provided the language with which to describe and even imagine the very godsbut on the other, monarchs were widely reviled in both theory and practice, from the Greek tyrant to biblical Saul. The Emperor Augustus loudly denied his own affinity to the office of king, even as he ruled alone and was revered as a god. In other words, kings stood both for the ideal ruler and the worst form of government. This class confronts the paradox of the King. This class will take a special look at the idea and institution of kingship in the Near East, among the Jews, Greeks, and Romans to assess and discuss similarities, differences, and mutual influences among these cultures. Through the lens of the king we will explore the idea of god, government, human frailty, and utopianism. Why did the rule of one prevail, why was it so attractive to so many? How was royal rule legitimized? What role did religious beliefs play for keeping a monarchical system stable? What did people expect from their rulers and what happened if the ruler failed to fulfill these expectations? How was the concept of monarchical rule adopted and transferred into other spheres, such as religious belief systems or hopes for messianic kingship? While kingship is a rich field of scholarly inquiry, the question of its ubiquity, and the entanglement and divergences of these three cultures is rarely studied in context and in comparison.
                                          BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                          ANCH 353-401 RHETORIC & THE COMMUNITY MCINERNEY, JEREMY CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 204 TR 0130PM-0300PM Rhetoric and the Community is a class designed to improve the quality of students' speaking abilities. Through debates, impromptu speeches and various other types of oral reports, students will develop their skills as speakers. The emphasis here is on practical advice, constant positive criticism and an active exploration of the art of oratory. We will emphasize the role of effective oral communication in contributing to a higher level of engagement and discourse in the community. This class will particularly help those planning careers in advocacy, public service, teaching and other areas where confident, thoughtful, and articulate communication are important.
                                            PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                            ANCH 545-401 SPATIAL ANALYSIS OF THE PAST COBB, PETER UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 TR 0130PM-0300PM Humans continuously move through, interact with, and modify their spaces, leaving a palimpsest of human activity all around us. The ability for digital methods to deal with larger datasets, at higher accuracies, and at multiple scales, lends itself particularly well to the study of diachronic human-space interaction. In this class, we will examine space at a range of scales from landscapes, to urban settings, to archaeological contexts and architecture. We digitally represent space using a variety of 3d and 2d data types, from models of land surfaces and buildings, to multispectral satellite imagery and urban plans. We will first gain experience creating, gathering, and manipulating spatial datasets in preparation for analysis. We will next practice a variety of analytical techniques on these data and examine case studies that have used spatial methods to draw important archaeological and historical conclusions. Tools covered in this class will include geographical information systems (GIS), global navigation satellite systems (GNSS), raster image processing, photogrammetry, and 3d spatial modeling softwares. Finally, we will gain experience with the visualization of our data and results, and the presentation of those results through open online publication.
                                              UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                              ANCH 606-401 Livy on Hellenistic history DAMON, CYNTHIA
                                              WILKER, JULIA
                                              JAFFE BUILDING 113 R 0130PM-0430PM We will read Livy 31-45, covering the years 200-167 BCE and treating (among other things) Rome's interaction with the kingdoms and leagues of the Hellenistic world in the period between the second and third Punic wars. Our historical focus will be on diplomacy, warfare, and alliances, Hellenistic kingship, Roman expansion and imperial rule in East, and the presence of the empire in Rome. Our literary focus will be on Livy's ab urbe condita as narrative and historical source, including his methodology, sources (including Polybius), and Latin style. We will be asking what Livy contributes to the analysis of the Hellenistic world and what Hellenistic history reveals about Livy's historiography. Final projects will take the form of papers suitable for presentation at the SCS Annual Meeting.
                                                CLST 019-402 TOPICS IN LITERATURE: EMOTIONS COPELAND, RITA VAN PELT LIBRARY 626 T 0130PM-0430PM An introduction to Writing about Literature, with emphasis on a particular theme, genre, or period.
                                                  FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
                                                  CLST 027-401 ANCIENT ROME GREY, CAMPBELL CLAUDIA COHEN HALL G17 MW 1200PM-0100PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                                                    History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
                                                    CLST 027-402 RECITATION SUSALLA, CYNTHIA DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 2N36 R 0900AM-1000AM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                                                      History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                      CLST 027-403 RECITATION SUSALLA, CYNTHIA DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 2N36 R 1030AM-1130AM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                                                        History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                        CLST 027-404 RECITATION BLASDEL, GAVIN DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 3C2 R 1100AM-1200PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                                                          History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                          CLST 027-405 RECITATION FORD, BRYN MEYERSON HALL B7 R 1200PM-0100PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                                                            History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                            CLST 027-406 RECITATION PILIPOW, RYAN WILLIAMS HALL 2 F 1000AM-1100AM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                                                              History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                              CLST 027-407 RECITATION FORD, BRYN CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203 F 0900AM-1000AM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                                                                History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                CLST 027-409 RECITATION ROGERS, JORDAN JAFFE BUILDING B17 F 1100AM-1200PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                                                                  History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                  CLST 027-410 RECITATION ROGERS, JORDAN WILLIAMS HALL 319 F 1200PM-0100PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                                                                    History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                    CLST 027-412 RECITATION PILIPOW, RYAN WILLIAMS HALL 321 F 1200PM-0100PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                                                                      History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                      CLST 027-413 RECITATION BLASDEL, GAVIN WILLIAMS HALL 318 F 0900AM-1000AM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                                                                        History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                        CLST 100-050 ANCIENT GREEK MYTHOLOGY AND RELIGION Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                                          Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; STUDY ABROAD
                                                                          CLST 100-401 GREEK & ROMAN MYTHOLOGY STRUCK, PETER STITELER HALL B6 MW 1100AM-1200PM Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                                            Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                            CLST 100-402 RECITATION FRENCH, EMILY WILLIAMS HALL 24 R 0900AM-1000AM Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                                              Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                              CLST 100-403 RECITATION ULRICH, JEFFREY WILLIAMS HALL 203 R 0900AM-1000AM Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                                                Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                CLST 100-404 RECITATION FRENCH, EMILY WILLIAMS HALL 307 F 1000AM-1100AM Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                                                  Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                  CLST 100-405 RECITATION PERSYN, MARCIE PSYCHOLOGY LAB C41 F 1000AM-1100AM Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                                                    Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                    CLST 100-406 RECITATION LEWIS, AMY WILLIAMS HALL 421 R 0300PM-0400PM Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                                                      Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                      CLST 100-407 RECITATION ULRICH, JEFFREY WILLIAMS HALL 307 R 1100AM-1200PM Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                                                        Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                        CLST 100-408 RECITATION CALLAGHAN, GREGORY MCNEIL CENTER FOR EARLY AMERI 105 R 1100AM-1200PM Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                                                          Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                          CLST 100-409 RECITATION PALAZZOLO, ELIZABETH COLLEGE HALL 318 R 0300PM-0400PM Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                                                            Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                            CLST 100-410 RECITATION PERSYN, MARCIE CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203 F 1100AM-1200PM Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                                                              Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                              CLST 100-411 RECITATION CALLAGHAN, GREGORY PSYCHOLOGY LAB C41 F 1100AM-1200PM Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                                                                Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                                CLST 100-412 RECITATION PALAZZOLO, ELIZABETH COLLEGE HALL 318 R 0200PM-0300PM Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                                                                  Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                                  CLST 100-413 RECITATION LEWIS, AMY CHEMISTRY BUILDING 109 R 0200PM-0300PM Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                                                                    Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                                    CLST 103-050 GREEK AND ROMAN PHILOSOPHY An introduction to the major philosophical thinkers and schools of ancient Greece and Rome (The Presocratics, Plato, Aristotle, Stoics, Epicureans, and Sceptics). Topics to be covered include: nature of the universe, the relation between knowledge and reality, and the nature of morality and the good life. We will also examine some of the ways in which non-philosophical writers (e.g., Homer, Hesiod, Aristophanes, and Thucydides) treat the issues discussed by the philosophers.
                                                                                                      History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; STUDY ABROAD
                                                                                                      CLST 103-601 HIST ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY PARKER, HAROLD WILLIAMS HALL 218 MW 0430PM-0600PM An introduction to the major philosophical thinkers and schools of ancient Greece and Rome (The Presocratics, Plato, Aristotle, Stoics, Epicureans, and Sceptics). Topics to be covered include: nature of the universe, the relation between knowledge and reality, and the nature of morality and the good life. We will also examine some of the ways in which non-philosophical writers (e.g., Homer, Hesiod, Aristophanes, and Thucydides) treat the issues discussed by the philosophers.
                                                                                                        History & Tradition Sector (all classes) HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR
                                                                                                        CLST 111-050 CLASSICAL ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY: OF HEROES, GODS AND MEN The cultures of Greece and Rome, what we call classical antiquity, span over a thousand years of multicultural achievement in the Mediterranean. This course tells the story of what it was like to live in the complex societies of ancient Greece and Rome. This story is told principally using the art, architecture, pottery and coins produced by these societies. We will examine both the bold and sexy, and the small and humble, from the Parthenon to wooden huts, from the Aphrodite of Knidos to the bones of a fisherman named Peter.
                                                                                                          History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; STUDY ABROAD
                                                                                                          CLST 118-401 AUGUSTAN CULTRL REVOL FARRELL JR, JOSEPH
                                                                                                          ROSE, CHARLES
                                                                                                          CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 204 TR 1200PM-0130PM The career of the man who was born Gaius Octavius and who died as the Emperor Augustus spanned the death of the Roman Republic, a protracted period of shared dictatorship and intermittent civil war. It ended with the concentration of power in the hands of one man and the foundation of a long-lasting hereditary monarchy. Over the course of this career, Octavius/Augustus transformed himself several times and oversaw the metamorphosis of the Roman state. Increasingly, historians have come to focus not only on the military, political, legal, and administrative reforms that made this transformation possible, but on the revolutionary cultural changes that supported measures and made the new order acceptable to Romans at different levels of society. This course considers these factors along with the idea of cultural revolution as a model of historical and archaeological analysis, particularly as concerns the role of the "great man" in bringing about such a revolution"
                                                                                                            CLST 123-001 GREAT DISCOV ARCHAEOLOGY MAHONEY, KYLE CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 402 TR 1200PM-0130PM Archaeology is a young and exciting scientific discipline created around 150 years ago as a way to discover and interpret the material remains of our human past. Many archaeological sites are world-famous: Pompeii, Troy, the pyramids of Egypt, the Parthenon of Athens, the temple complex at Angkor, to name a few. In this course, we will examine many important archaeological sites, mainly in the Old World of the Mediterranean, Near East, and Asia, but also in the New World of North and South America. Using a thematic and comparative approach, we will delve deeper to explore the societies that produced these wonders, and examine cultural similarities and differences across the ancient world. This course is a non-technical introduction for students interested in archaeology, history, art history, anthropology, or related subjects. There are no prerequisites. A typical sequence of meetings will begin with lecture on a particular theme, such as Writing Systems or Sacred Spaces and Places, followed by the presentation of relevant monuments, sites, or regions from different parts of the world, with discussion and assessment of the cross-cultural similarities and differences. In this way, both the great diversity of culture in our world, as well as our underlying similarities, can be revealed. How different are we from our ancestors who lived hundreds or thousands of years ago? Museum visits and exercises will allow students to engage with the material creations of these civilizations.
                                                                                                              CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                                              CLST 148-401 FOOD AND FIRE MOORE, KATHERINE UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 MW 1030AM-1200PM This course will let students explore the essential heritage of human technology through archaeology. People have been transforming their environment from the first use of fire for cooking. Since then, humans have adapted to the world they created using the resources around them. We use artifacts to understand how the archaeological record can be used to trace breakthroughs such as breaking stone and bone, baking bread, weaving cloth and firing pottery and metals. The seminar will meet in the Penn Museum's new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials. Students will become familiar with the Museum's collections and the scientific methods used to study different materials. Class sessions will include discussions, guest presentations, museum field trips, and hands-on experience in the laboratory.
                                                                                                                Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY
                                                                                                                CLST 209-401 ROMAN EMPIRE GREY, CAMPBELL CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203 MW 0330PM-0500PM "They create a desert and call it peace," wrote Tacitus in describing the response of the conquered to Rome's power, but the Roman Peace also brought with it other, less dramatic changes. In this class we will break the Roman Empire down down into a series of vignettes, using literature and archaeology to supply us us with the material for a fresh look at Roman society. Our aim isto uncover the complexity of Roman society, and to acknowledge the multiple voices that together made up the ancient Mediterranean world. We will focus upon key structural aspects of Roman society and culture, but explore them in new ways, using texts that highlight dissent, conflict and tension as they indicate cohesion and Rome's hegemony over the Mediterranean in antiquity. Texts will be read in translation. No prerequisites, although students are encouraged to take this course after taking ANCH 027/HIST 027.
                                                                                                                  CLST 214-601 THE HERO'S QUEST GLAUTHIER, PATRICK WILLIAMS HALL 303 MW 0630PM-0800PM
                                                                                                                    CLST 223-001 Ages of Homer: An Archaeological Intro To the Greek Bronze & Iron Ages TARTARON, THOMAS CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 237 TR 0130PM-0300PM This illustrated lecture course surveys the prehistory and early history of the Greek world through texts and material remains, with the aim of bringing to life the society, economy, and politics of this ancient era. Among the topics are the rise and fall of the great Bronze Age civilizations of the Aegean area, the Minoans of Crete and the Mycenaeans of the Greek mainland; the cataclysmic volcanic eruption on the island of Thera and its long-term consequences; the possibly historical Trojan War; the Homeric world of the Dark Age that followed the collapse of the Mycenaean palaces; and the Greek renaissance of the eighth century B.C.-including the adoption of the alphabet, the great colonizing movement, and the Panhellenic sanctuaries-that laid the foundation for the Classical world to come. Ages of Homer is part of a sequence of introductory courses on the archaeology of the Greco-Roman world , which also includes Introduction to Greek Archaeology (CLS 275) and Introduction to Roman Archaeology (CLST 274). There are no prerequisites, and these courses need not be taken in a particular order
                                                                                                                      CLST 268-401 LVNG WRLD IN ARCH SCI: LIVING WORLD IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SCIENCE MONGE, JANET
                                                                                                                      MOORE, KATHERINE
                                                                                                                      WHITE, CHANTEL
                                                                                                                      UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 TR 1200PM-0130PM By focusing on the scientific analysis of archaeological remains, this course will explore life and death in the past. It takes place in the new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and is team taught in three modules: human skeletal analysis, analysis of animal remains, and analysis of plant remains. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how organic materials provide key information about past environments, human behavior, and cultural change through discussions of topics such as health and disease, inequality, and food.
                                                                                                                        OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO
                                                                                                                        CLST 298-050 PLATO
                                                                                                                          STUDY ABROAD
                                                                                                                          CLST 298-051 CLASSICAL QUESTIONS
                                                                                                                            STUDY ABROAD
                                                                                                                            CLST 298-052 CLASSICAL CULTURE: AN INTRODUCTION
                                                                                                                              STUDY ABROAD
                                                                                                                              CLST 298-053 ANCIENT CITY: ART/ARCH
                                                                                                                                STUDY ABROAD
                                                                                                                                CLST 298-054 ANCIENT CITY: POL/SOC/CUL
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                                                                                                                                  CLST 298-055 RENAISSANCE AND BAROQUE ART HISTORY
                                                                                                                                    STUDY ABROAD
                                                                                                                                    CLST 298-056 CONSTANTINOPLE: IMPERIAL CAPITAL - MEDIEVAL METROPOLIS
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                                                                                                                                      CLST 302-401 ODYSSEY & ITS AFTERLIFE MURNAGHAN, SHEILA CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 237 MW 0330PM-0500PM As an epic account of wandering, survival, and homecoming, Homer's Odyssey has been a constant source of themes and images with which to define and redefine the nature of heroism, the sources of identity, and the challenge of finding a place in the world. This course will begin with a close reading of the Odyssey in translation, with particular attention to Odysseus as a post-Trojan War hero; to the roles of women, especially Odysseus' faithful and brilliant wife Penelope; and to the uses of poetry and story-telling in creating individual and cultural identities. We will then consider how later authors have drawn on these perspectives to construct their own visions, reading works, or parts of works, by such authors as Virgil, Dante, Tennyson, James Joyce, Constantine Cavafy, Derek Walcott, and Margaret Atwood. Each student will choose a work inspired by the Odyssey (from possibilities spanning many periods, cultural traditions, and media) on which to give a presentation and write a paper.
                                                                                                                                        CLST 303-401 INTRODUCTION TO MUSEUMS BROWNLEE, DAVID
                                                                                                                                        BROWNLEE, ANN
                                                                                                                                        JAFFE BUILDING 113 W 0200PM-0500PM This course Presents an introduction to the history, theory and modern practice of museums. Using the resources of the University Museum, the course will introduce students to curatorial practice, education, exhibition design and conservation, while exploring the theoretical and ethical issues confronted by museums. Particularly relevant for those interested in archaeology, anthropology, art history, cultural heritage and public education.
                                                                                                                                          CLST 310-301 Ancient and Modern Constitution Making MULHERN, JOHN CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 392 MW 0200PM-0330PM Constitution making reemerged as an urgent issue in the Twentieth Century with the transformation of colonial empires after World War II and the collapse of the Soviet empire near the end of the century. Constitution making issues madethemselves felt also in the constitutionally more mature locations. Even in the British Isles, for example, nationalist movements prompted new constitutional arrangements. And in the Twenty-First Century, as competition for control of Central Asia, the Middle East, and Northern Africa has reintensified, the written constitution has been hailed by some as the vehicle for changing long established cultures. The most striking feature of constitution making in the last two centuries may be its uneven success when itcomes to reducing political conflict and in reforming if not improving customs, character, habits, and actions. What might explain this uneven success? Is an explanation to be found by going back to what appear to be the roots of constitution making? This course builds on contemporary scholarship to reconstruct what we may call the constitution making tradition as it develops in the main ancient texts, which are read in English translation. The ancient texts are taken from Herodotus, the Pseudo-Xenophon, Diodorus Siculus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Plato, the author of the Aristotelian Athenian Constitution, Aristotle himself, Polybius, Cicero, Tacitus, Plutarch, Diogenes Laertius, and Augustine. The course traces this tradition through the classically trained thinkers of the Seventeenth Century, following linguistic and other clues that carry one up to the American colonial compacts and covenants, the so-called state constitutions, and the debates in the U.S. Constitutional Convention; and it continues through Nineteenth-Century and Twentieth-Century constitution making into todays constitution making efforts in Europe, North Africa, and elsewhere, concluding with an examination, perhaps, of the Egyptian constitution 2014. The course is conducted as a group tutorial. In individual tutorials, where is one on one, the tutor typically assigns a paper to a student each week, and the student reads it the next week and takes questions from the tutor. In a group tutorial, the professor offers a prelecture to the students in each session on the text that they will read next to help them understand its historical, literary, and political context. In the next class, the students read short papers on the text, and these papers are discussed by other students and by the professor. The professor then provides a summary lecture on the text just completed, if necessary, and a prelecture on the set for the next class. At the end of the course, the students have reconstructed the constitutionmaking tradition for themselves from the primary sources. This course became a BFS course in Spring 2003.
                                                                                                                                            BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                                                                                                                            CLST 338-401 POWER & PERIL: THE PARADOX OF MONARCHY AMONG ANCIENT GREEKS, ROMANS & JEWS DOHRMANN, NATALIE
                                                                                                                                            WILKER, JULIA
                                                                                                                                            WILLIAMS HALL 3 MW 0330PM-0500PM We imagine Ancient Greece and Rome as the cradles of democracy and republicanism, the early Judea as pious theocracy, but the evidence tells us that monarchy was the most common and prevalent form of government in antiquity (and the premodern world in general). Despite their ubiquity, the King was a polarizing figurein reality and in conception. On the one hand, some idealized the monarchy as the ideal leader, and monarchy provided the language with which to describe and even imagine the very godsbut on the other, monarchs were widely reviled in both theory and practice, from the Greek tyrant to biblical Saul. The Emperor Augustus loudly denied his own affinity to the office of king, even as he ruled alone and was revered as a god. In other words, kings stood both for the ideal ruler and the worst form of government. This class confronts the paradox of the King. This class will take a special look at the idea and institution of kingship in the Near East, among the Jews, Greeks, and Romans to assess and discuss similarities, differences, and mutual influences among these cultures. Through the lens of the king we will explore the idea of god, government, human frailty, and utopianism. Why did the rule of one prevail, why was it so attractive to so many? How was royal rule legitimized? What role did religious beliefs play for keeping a monarchical system stable? What did people expect from their rulers and what happened if the ruler failed to fulfill these expectations? How was the concept of monarchical rule adopted and transferred into other spheres, such as religious belief systems or hopes for messianic kingship? While kingship is a rich field of scholarly inquiry, the question of its ubiquity, and the entanglement and divergences of these three cultures is rarely studied in context and in comparison.
                                                                                                                                              BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                                                                                                                              CLST 353-401 RHETORIC & THE COMMUNITY MCINERNEY, JEREMY CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 204 TR 0130PM-0300PM Rhetoric and the Community is a class designed to improve the quality of students' speaking abilities. Through debates, impromptu speeches and various other types of oral reports, students will develop their skills as speakers. The emphasis here is on practical advice, constant positive criticism and an active exploration of the art of oratory. We will emphasize the role of effective oral communication in contributing to a higher level of engagement and discourse in the community. This class will particularly help those planning careers in advocacy, public service, teaching and other areas where confident, thoughtful, and articulate communication are important.
                                                                                                                                                PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                                                                                                                CLST 396-401 HIST LITERARY CRITICISM: LIT THEORY ANC TO MODERN COPELAND, RITA FISHER-BENNETT HALL 224 MW 0330PM-0500PM This is a course on the history of literary theory, a survey of major debates about literature, poetics, and ideas about what literary texts should do, from ancient Greece to examples of modern European thought. The first half of the course will focus on early periods: Greek and Roman antiquity, especially Plato and Aristotle; the medieval period (including St. Augustine, Dante, and Boccaccio), and the early modern period ( such as Philip Sidney and Giambattista Vico). We'll move into modern and 20th century by looking at the literary (or "art") theories of some major philosophers, artists, and poetsKant, Hegel, Shelley, Marx, the painter William Morris, Freud, and the critic Walter Benjamin. We'll end with a look at Foucault's work. The point of this course is to consider closely the Western European tradition which generated questions that are still with us, such as: what is the "aesthetic"; what is "imitation" or mimesis; how are we to know an author's intention; and under what circumstances should literary texts ever be censored. During the semester there will be four short writing assignments in the form of analytical essays (3 pages each), and students can use these small assignments to build into a long writing assignment on a single text or group of texts at the end of the term. Most of our readings will come from a published anthology of literary criticism and theory; a few readings will be on Canvas.
                                                                                                                                                  BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                                                                                                                                  CLST 402-601 POST BACC:GREEK MURNAGHAN, SHEILA CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 237 TR 0300PM-0430PM Intensive Greek reading course for students in the Postbac program.
                                                                                                                                                    CLST 402-602 RECITATION ULRICH, JEFFREY CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 392 F 1000AM-1100AM Intensive Greek reading course for students in the Postbac program.
                                                                                                                                                      SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                                                                                      CLST 403-601 POST BACC LATIN NISHIMURA-JENSEN, JULIE CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 337 MWF 1100AM-1200PM Advanced study in Latin for students enrolled in the Post-Baccalaureate Program in Classical Studies. Permission of the instructor required.
                                                                                                                                                        CLST 403-602 RECITATION PALAZZOLO, ELIZABETH MEYERSON HALL B4 F 1100AM-1200PM Advanced study in Latin for students enrolled in the Post-Baccalaureate Program in Classical Studies. Permission of the instructor required.
                                                                                                                                                          SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                                                                                          CLST 419-401 MINING ARCHAEOLOGY JANSEN, JAN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 W 0200PM-0500PM
                                                                                                                                                            CLST 512-401 Petrography of Cultural Materials BOILEAU, MARIE-CLAUDE W 1000AM-0100PM Introduction to thin-section petrography of stone and ceramic archaeological materials. Using polarized light microscopy, the first half of this course will cover the basics of mineralogy and the petrography of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. The second half will focus on the petrographic description of ceramic materials, mainly pottery, with emphasis on the interpretation of provenance and technology. As part of this course, students will characterize and analyze archaeological samples from various collections. Prior knowledge of geology is not required.
                                                                                                                                                              CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO
                                                                                                                                                              CLST 516-301 HISTORICAL LINGUISTICS RINGE, DONALD FISHER-BENNETT HALL 19 W 0200PM-0500PM This course is a practical and theoretical introduction to Ancient Greek metrics. Students will read and analyze many passages of verse chosen from all the Greek metrical traditions. Required work will include a final term paper on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor.
                                                                                                                                                                CLST 521-401 TOPICS: GREEK/ROMAN ART: Late Antique Art and Artifact KUTTNER, ANN JAFFE BUILDING B17 W 0330PM-0630PM Topic Varies. Please check website for more details. Spring 2016: Rome and its world became dense with monuments, artifacts, images, structures, spaces which addressed individual and collective concerns that we can call political. In private and public displays, these concerns included citizenship and class standing, public achievement and power, the construction of social memory, and the very nature of being Roman in a city, republic, empire. Of interest here also are the roles of women and of the empire's indigenous peoples. Such displays often engaged, too, with religion, in a providential understanding of historical event. Cases range from displays of high design, art , to seemingly crude graphic communications; all shed light on Roman visual language, and its makers, patrons and spectators. Of especial interest to students in ArtH, AAMW, AncH, ClSt, RelSt, Anthro. No prior background in ancient Roman studies or art history/archaeology requireOpen to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor.
                                                                                                                                                                  CLST 545-401 SPATIAL ANALYSIS OF THE PAST COBB, PETER UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 TR 0130PM-0300PM Humans continuously move through, interact with, and modify their spaces, leaving a palimpsest of human activity all around us. The ability for digital methods to deal with larger datasets, at higher accuracies, and at multiple scales, lends itself particularly well to the study of diachronic human-space interaction. In this class, we will examine space at a range of scales from landscapes, to urban settings, to archaeological contexts and architecture. We digitally represent space using a variety of 3d and 2d data types, from models of land surfaces and buildings, to multispectral satellite imagery and urban plans. We will first gain experience creating, gathering, and manipulating spatial datasets in preparation for analysis. We will next practice a variety of analytical techniques on these data and examine case studies that have used spatial methods to draw important archaeological and historical conclusions. Tools covered in this class will include geographical information systems (GIS), global navigation satellite systems (GNSS), raster image processing, photogrammetry, and 3d spatial modeling softwares. Finally, we will gain experience with the visualization of our data and results, and the presentation of those results through open online publication.
                                                                                                                                                                    UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                                                    CLST 568-401 LVNG WRLD IN ARCH SCI: LIVING WORLD IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SCIENCE MONGE, JANET
                                                                                                                                                                    MOORE, KATHERINE
                                                                                                                                                                    WHITE, CHANTEL
                                                                                                                                                                    UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 TR 1200PM-0130PM By focusing on the scientific analysis of archaeological remains, this course will explore life and death in the past. It takes place in the new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and is team taught in three modules: human skeletal analysis, analysis of animal remains, and analysis of plant remains. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how organic materials provide key information about past environments, human behavior, and cultural change through discussions of topics such as health and disease, inequality, and food.
                                                                                                                                                                      OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                                                      CLST 698-301 PROSPECTUS WORKSHOP WILSON, EMILY WILLIAMS HALL 705 T 0900AM-1200PM Designed to prepare graduates in any aspect of study in the ancient world to prepare for the dissertation prospectus. Course will be centered around individual presentations and group critique of prospectus' in process, as well the fundamentals of large-project research design and presentation.
                                                                                                                                                                        PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                                                                                                                        CLST 707-401 TOPICS IN AEGEAN ARCHAEOLOGY TARTARON, THOMAS FISHER-BENNETT HALL 17 W 0100PM-0400PM Topics vary. This course explores current topics in Aegean archaeology. It is designed to inform and prompt debate and discussion on substantive, methodological, and theoretical matters of current interest, within a geographical and/or chronological framework. Spring 2017 topic TBA.
                                                                                                                                                                          UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                                                          GREK 015-050 MODERN GREEK This course is designed for students with no prior knowledge of the modern Greek Language. Instructions are theme based and is supported by a Textbook as well as other written or audiovisual material. It provides the framework for development of all communicative skills (reading, writing, comprehension and speaking) at a basic level. The course also introduces students to aspects of Modern Greek culture that are close to students' own horizon, while it exposes them to academic presentations of Greek history, arts, and current affairs. Quizzes, finals and short individual work with presentation are the testing tools. The completion of this unit does NOT satisfy the language requirement.
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                                                                                                                                                                            GREK 016-050 MODERN GREEK FIRST YEAR SECOND SEMESTER Continuation of Elementary Modern Greek I, with increased emphasis on reading and writing.
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                                                                                                                                                                              GREK 016-680 ELEM MODERN GREEK II TSEKOURA, DIMITRA WILLIAMS HALL 6 MW 0500PM-0700PM Continuation of Elementary Modern Greek I, with increased emphasis on reading and writing.
                                                                                                                                                                                GREK 102-301 ELEM CLASSICAL GREEK II NISHIMURA-JENSEN, JULIE CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 237 MWF 0100PM-0200PM Students complete their study of the morphology and syntax of Classical Greek. We begin the semester with continuing exercises in grammar and translation, then gradually shift emphasis to reading unadapted Greek texts.
                                                                                                                                                                                  LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                                                                  GREK 116-680 GREEK/HERITAGE SPKRS II TSEKOURA, DIMITRA WILLIAMS HALL 304 TR 0430PM-0600PM It is the continuation of GREK 115 with completing Grammar (passive voice as well as unusual nouns and adjectives etc.,) and adding more challenging reading and writing material. The completion of this course satisfies the language requirement. ALL students completing the HSI GREK 115 are eligible toenroll. ALL OTHERS will have to take a placement test.
                                                                                                                                                                                    SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                                                                                                                                                                                    GREK 204-301 INTERMED GREEK: POETRY GLAUTHIER, PATRICK CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 237 TR 1200PM-0130PM We will read a selection of passages from Greek poetic authors, ranging from Homer to tragedy.
                                                                                                                                                                                      SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                                                                                                                                                                                      GREK 309-050 ADVANCED GREEK This course is for those who have completed Greek 204, Greek 212, or equivalent. Close reading and discussion of a Greek author or a particular genre of Greek literature. Topics will vary each semester, and the course may be repeated for credit.
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                                                                                                                                                                                        GREK 309-301 Sophocles: Antigone and Oedipus Rex ULRICH, JEFFREY MCNEIL CENTER FOR EARLY AMERI 105 TR 1200PM-0120PM This course is for those who have completed Greek 204, Greek 212, or equivalent. Close reading and discussion of a Greek author or a particular genre of Greek literature. Topics will vary each semester, and the course may be repeated for credit.
                                                                                                                                                                                          GREK 602-401 Hippocrates and Greek Intellectual Culture of the Classical Period ROSEN, RALPH CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203 T 0130PM-0430PM This graduate seminar will explore the rich and varied intellectual debates of the Classical period, using early Hippocratic texts to introduce some of the major questions that occupied contemporary thinkers. Such topics include, among others, the nature of matter and the body, the interaction of humans and environment, 'anthropology', empiricism, inference from signs, health and disease. We will focus on selections from the Greek texts of the Hippocratic 'Airs Waters Places', 'Nature of Man', 'Sacred Disease', 'On Ancient Medicine', and Epidemics in their relation to other contemporary authors, such as Herodotus, Thucydides, assorted Presocratics and Sophists, and Plato.
                                                                                                                                                                                            FOR PHD STUDENTS ONLY
                                                                                                                                                                                            LATN 101-050 LATIN AND THE LEGACY OF THE ROMAN WORLD An introduction to the Latin language for beginners. Students begin learning grammar and vocabulary, with practical exercises in reading in writing. By the end of the course students will be able to read and analyze simple Latin texts, including selected Roman inscriptions in the Penn Museum.
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                                                                                                                                                                                              LATN 102-301 ELEMENTARY LATIN II BENSCH-SCHAUS, AMELIA CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203 MWF 1000AM-1100AM Prerequisite(s): LATN 101 or equivalent. Completes the introduction to the Latin language begun in 101. By the end of the course students will have a complete working knowledge of Latin grammar, a growing vocabulary, and experience in reading simple continuous texts.
                                                                                                                                                                                                LATN 102-302 ELEMENTARY LATIN II HANSON, WESLEY CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 237 MWF 1100AM-1200PM Prerequisite(s): LATN 101 or equivalent. Completes the introduction to the Latin language begun in 101. By the end of the course students will have a complete working knowledge of Latin grammar, a growing vocabulary, and experience in reading simple continuous texts.
                                                                                                                                                                                                  LATN 102-601 ELEMENTARY LATIN II PALAZZOLO, ELIZABETH WILLIAMS HALL 316 TR 0630PM-0815PM Prerequisite(s): LATN 101 or equivalent. Completes the introduction to the Latin language begun in 101. By the end of the course students will have a complete working knowledge of Latin grammar, a growing vocabulary, and experience in reading simple continuous texts.
                                                                                                                                                                                                    LATN 204-301 INTERMED LATIN: POETRY REINHARDT, ISABELLA CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 493 MWF 1000AM-1100AM Prerequisite(s): LATN 203 or equivalent (such as placement score of 600). Continuous reading of several Latin authors in poetry (e.g., Ovid, Virgil, Horace) as well as some more complex prose, in combination with ongoing review of Latin grammar. By the end of the course students will have thorough familiarity with the grammar, vocabulary, and style and style of the selected authors, will be able to tackle previously unseen unseen passages by them, and will be able to discuss language and interpretation. Note: Completion of Latin 204 with C- or higher fulfills Penn's Foreign Language Requirement. "Please note: the MW 3.30-5.00 section combines Latin reading with practicalLatin-based tutoring in a West Philadelphia elementary school."
                                                                                                                                                                                                      SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                                                                                                                                                                                                      LATN 204-302 INTERMED LATIN: POETRY CREDO, BRIAN COLLEGE HALL 318 MWF 1100AM-1200PM Prerequisite(s): LATN 203 or equivalent (such as placement score of 600). Continuous reading of several Latin authors in poetry (e.g., Ovid, Virgil, Horace) as well as some more complex prose, in combination with ongoing review of Latin grammar. By the end of the course students will have thorough familiarity with the grammar, vocabulary, and style and style of the selected authors, will be able to tackle previously unseen unseen passages by them, and will be able to discuss language and interpretation. Note: Completion of Latin 204 with C- or higher fulfills Penn's Foreign Language Requirement. "Please note: the MW 3.30-5.00 section combines Latin reading with practicalLatin-based tutoring in a West Philadelphia elementary school."
                                                                                                                                                                                                        SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                                                                                                                                                                                                        LATN 204-601 INTERMED LATIN: POETRY GLAUTHIER, PATRICK WILLIAMS HALL 303 MW 0430PM-0600PM Prerequisite(s): LATN 203 or equivalent (such as placement score of 600). Continuous reading of several Latin authors in poetry (e.g., Ovid, Virgil, Horace) as well as some more complex prose, in combination with ongoing review of Latin grammar. By the end of the course students will have thorough familiarity with the grammar, vocabulary, and style and style of the selected authors, will be able to tackle previously unseen unseen passages by them, and will be able to discuss language and interpretation. Note: Completion of Latin 204 with C- or higher fulfills Penn's Foreign Language Requirement. "Please note: the MW 3.30-5.00 section combines Latin reading with practicalLatin-based tutoring in a West Philadelphia elementary school."
                                                                                                                                                                                                          LATN 309-301 TOPICS: LATIN LITERATURE: THE FABLES OF PHAEDRUS FARRELL JR, JOSEPH CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 204 TR 1030AM-1200PM This course is for those who have completed Latin 204, Latin 212, or equivalent (such as placement score of 650, or AP score of 4 or 5). Close reading and discussion of a Latin author or a particular genre of latin literature. Topics will vary each semester, and the course may be repeated for credit. Assignments will include syntactic and literary analysis on a daily basis, a midterm, a paper, and a final exam. We will read in Latin substantial portions of the three books of Caesar's Civil War and the ten books of Lucans, and the entirety of both works in English. Both authors treat the first phase of the civil war that finally destroyed the Roman Republic, the contest between Caesar and Pompey for supremacy at Rome. This phase ended at the battle of Pharsalus in August of 48 BCE. Caesar wrote his narrative shortly after the wars end and before its effects were fully felt, Lucan wrote his epic poem roughly a century later from the perspective of the principate established in its essentials by Caesar's heir, Augustus. Although the narratives cover the same events, the two authors' literary and political aims, as well as their historical contexts, produced wildly divergent stories. We will read them in tandem.
                                                                                                                                                                                                            LATN 606-401 Livy on Hellenistic history DAMON, CYNTHIA
                                                                                                                                                                                                            WILKER, JULIA
                                                                                                                                                                                                            JAFFE BUILDING 113 R 0130PM-0430PM We will read Livy 31-45, covering the years 200-167 BCE and treating (among other things) Rome's interaction with the kingdoms and leagues of the Hellenistic world in the period between the second and third Punic wars. Our historical focus will be on diplomacy, warfare, and alliances, Hellenistic kingship, Roman expansion and imperial rule in East, and the presence of the empire in Rome. Our literary focus will be on Livy's ab urbe condita as narrative and historical source, including his methodology, sources (including Polybius), and Latin style. We will be asking what Livy contributes to the analysis of the Hellenistic world and what Hellenistic history reveals about Livy's historiography. Final projects will take the form of papers suitable for presentation at the SCS Annual Meeting.