Courses for Spring 2020

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
ANCH 027-401 ANCIENT ROME KER, JAMES DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB A1 MW 1200PM-0100PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
    History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
    ANCH 027-402 RECITATION NAQVI, THEODORA EDUCATION BUILDING 007 R 0900AM-1000AM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
      History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
      ANCH 027-403 RECITATION ELIAS, IRENE FISHER-BENNETT HALL 244 F 1100AM-1200PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
        History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
        ANCH 027-404 RECITATION DIETRICH, MAXWELL FISHER-BENNETT HALL 201 F 1200PM-0100PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
          History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
          ANCH 027-405 RECITATION NAQVI, THEODORA WILLIAMS HALL 25 R 1200PM-0100PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
            History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
            ANCH 027-406 RECITATION DIETRICH, MAXWELL FISHER-BENNETT HALL 244 F 1000AM-1100AM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
              History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
              ANCH 027-407 RECITATION ELIAS, IRENE FISHER-BENNETT HALL 244 F 1200PM-0100PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                ANCH 027-408 RECITATION KER, JAMES WILLIAMS HALL 301 R 1100AM-1200PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                  History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                  ANCH 027-409 RECITATION KER, JAMES WILLIAMS HALL 220 R 1200PM-0100PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                    History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                    ANCH 027-789 RECITATION The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                      History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
                      ANCH 136-401 THE ANCIENT ECONOMY BOWES, KIMBERLY CLAIRE M. FAGIN HALL (NURSING 214 TR 1130AM-0100PM This class presents an introduction to economies before economics, a study of economic activity in the Greco-Roman world. Ancient Greece and Rome have been called some of the first "global" economies - they engaged in long-distance trade, introduced the first coinage systems, and built and manufactured at large scales. At the same time, they remained agrarian societies, with majority peasant populations, high levels of inequality and social systems that often placed social capital ahead of profit. Using textual sources, archaeology and techniques from the natural and social sciences, this class will not only look at basic elements of economic activity in the ancient world - demographics, trade, monetization, industry - but also ask critical questions about how - or if -modern economic methods can be applied to the distant past. No previous knowledge of the ancient world or economics is necessary.
                        Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
                        ANCH 316-401 AFRICA AND ROMAN LIT LEWIS, AMY PERELMAN CENTER FOR POLITICAL 100 TR 1200PM-0130PM In this course, we will explore race and ethnicity in the Roman world by focusing on the life and works of Roman Africans and the ways in which non-African Romans engaged with and presented the peoples of Africa. The course covers Roman literature in translation from the comedies of Plautus produced in the late 3rd - 2nd centuries BCE, to African Christian writing of the 5th century CE. It also covers a wide range of genres: we will examine how Roman writers articulate questions of race in comedy and satire, epic, history, biography, and elegy among others. We will read African writers (Apuleius, Augustine) and ask how their Africanness influences their works. We will read Roman accounts of journeys to Africa, wars with Africa, and encounters with Africans to ask how the Romans saw themselves as different from or similar to Africans. The course will also explore in more general terms how Romans talk about race: did racism exist? What aspects of different cultures and peoples did Romans choose to emphasize when they talked of non-Romans?
                          ANCH 353-401 RHETORIC & THE COMMUNITY: RHETORIC & THE COMMUNITY (SNF PAIDEIA PROGRAM COURSE) MCINERNEY, JEREMY WILLIAMS HALL 4 TR 0300PM-0430PM Rhetoric and the Community is a class designed to improve the quality of students' speaking abilities. Through debates, impromptu speeches and various other types of oral reports, students will develop their skills as speakers. The emphasis here is on practical advice, constant positive criticism and an active exploration of the art of oratory. We will emphasize the role of effective oral communication in contributing to a higher level of engagement and discourse in the community. This class will particularly help those planning careers in advocacy, public service, teaching and other areas where confident, thoughtful, and articulate communication are important.
                            DESIGNATED SNF PAIDEIA PROGRAM COURSE; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                            ANCH 612-401 THE FLAVIAN ERA WILKER, JULIA
                            DAMON, CYNTHIA
                            CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 337 R 0100PM-0400PM The time of the Flavians (69-96 BCE) holds a special place in Roman history and culture as it marks the transition from the Julio-Claudian period to the High Empire. Historically, the rule of Rome's second dynasty saw a stabilization of the imperial power system, the consolidation of social and political hierarchies, and an increasing integration of the empire. Major construction projects reshaped the city of Rome, topographically and ideologically. The literary production in various genres reached a new peak, developed new forms, and explored new topics. The unusually high number of Greek and Latin texts and documents preserved allow us to analyze such changes closely; our focus will be on the interrelation and conjunction of these developments. Final projects will take the form of papers suitable for presentation at the SCS Annual Meeting.
                              CLST 027-401 ANCIENT ROME KER, JAMES DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB A1 MW 1200PM-0100PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                                History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
                                CLST 027-402 RECITATION NAQVI, THEODORA EDUCATION BUILDING 007 R 0900AM-1000AM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                                  History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                  CLST 027-403 RECITATION ELIAS, IRENE FISHER-BENNETT HALL 244 F 1100AM-1200PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                                    History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                    CLST 027-404 RECITATION DIETRICH, MAXWELL FISHER-BENNETT HALL 201 F 1200PM-0100PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                                      History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                      CLST 027-405 RECITATION NAQVI, THEODORA WILLIAMS HALL 25 R 1200PM-0100PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                                        History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                        CLST 027-406 RECITATION DIETRICH, MAXWELL FISHER-BENNETT HALL 244 F 1000AM-1100AM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                                          History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                          CLST 027-407 RECITATION ELIAS, IRENE FISHER-BENNETT HALL 244 F 1200PM-0100PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                                            History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                            CLST 027-408 RECITATION KER, JAMES WILLIAMS HALL 301 R 1100AM-1200PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                                              History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                              CLST 027-409 RECITATION KER, JAMES WILLIAMS HALL 220 R 1200PM-0100PM The Roman Empire was one of the few great world states-one that unified a large area around the Mediterranean Sea-an area never subsequently united as part of a single state. Whereas the great achievements of the Greeks were in the realm of ideas and concepts (democracy, philosophy, art, literature, drama) those of the Romans tended to be in the pragmatic spheres of ruling and controlling subject peoples and integrating them under the aegis of an imperial state. Conquest, warfare, administration, and law making were the great successes of the Roman state. We will look at this process from its inception and trace the formation of Rome's Mediterranean empire over the last three centuries BC; we shall then consider the social, economic and political consequences of this great achievement, especially the great political transition from the Republic (rule by the Senate) to the Principate (rule by emperors). We shall also consider limitations to Roman power and various types of challenges, military, cultural, and religious, to the hegemony of the Roman state. Finally, we shall try to understand the process of the development of a distinctive Roman culture from the emergence new forms of literature, like satire, to the gladiatorial arena as typical elements that contributed to a Roman social order.
                                                History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                CLST 100-401 GREEK & ROMAN MYTHOLOGY STRUCK, PETER STITELER HALL B6 MW 1100AM-1200PM Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                  Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                  CLST 100-402 RECITATION KOVALCHUK, MARIA UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 R 0300PM-0400PM Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                    Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                    CLST 100-403 RECITATION HALSTEAD, HENRIETTA WILLIAMS HALL 214 R 1100AM-1200PM Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                      Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                      CLST 100-404 RECITATION WEST, KYLE CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203 R 1100AM-1200PM Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                        Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                        CLST 100-405 RECITATION LI, WEIQUN WILLIAMS HALL 301 R 0300PM-0400PM Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                          Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                          CLST 100-406 RECITATION WEST, KYLE WILLIAMS HALL 319 F 1100AM-1200PM Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                            Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                            CLST 100-407 RECITATION KOVALCHUK, MARIA CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203 F 1100AM-1200PM Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                              Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                              CLST 100-408 RECITATION UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 R 0200PM-0300PM Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                                Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                CLST 100-409 RECITATION HALSTEAD, HENRIETTA WILLIAMS HALL 321 R 0200PM-0300PM Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                                  Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                  CLST 100-410 RECITATION GOLUBOVIC, NIKOLA CASTER BUILDING A14 F 1100AM-1200PM Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                                    Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                    CLST 100-411 RECITATION GOLUBOVIC, NIKOLA CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 237 R 1100AM-1200PM Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                                      Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                      CLST 100-789 RECITATION Myths are traditional stories that have endured many years. Some of them have to do with events of great importance, such as the founding of a nation. Others tell the stories of great heroes and heroines and their exploits and courage in the face of adversity. Still others are simple tales about otherwise unremarkable people who get into trouble or do some great deed. What are we to make of all these tales, and why do people seem to like to hear them? This course will focus on the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as a few contemporary American ones, as a way of exploring the nature of myth and the function it plays for individuals, societies, and nations. We will also pay some attention to the way the Greeks and Romans themselves understood their own myths. Are myths subtle codes that contain some universal truth? Are they a window on the deep recesses of a particular culture? Are they entertaining stories that people like to tell over and over? Are they a set of blinders that all of us wear, though we do not realize it? We investigate these questions through a variety of topics creation of the universe between gods and mortals, religion and family, sex, love, madness, and death.
                                                                        Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
                                                                        CLST 123-001 GREAT DISCOV ARCHAEOLOGY TARTARON, THOMAS CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 402 MW 0200PM-0330PM In this course, we examine famous (Pompeii, Troy, Machu Picchu) and not-so-famous (Uluburun, Kalamianos) archaeological sites, mainly in the Old World of the Mediterranean, Near East, and Asia, but also in the New World of North and South America. We adopt a thematic and comparative approach to delve deeper to explore these societies and examine cultural similarities and differences across the ancient world. A typical sequence of meetings will begin with lecture on a particular theme, such as Writing Systems or Sacred Spaces and Places, followed by the presentation of relevant monuments, sites, or regions from different parts of the world, with discussion and assessment of the cross-cultural similarities and differences. In this way, both the great diversity of culture in our world, as well as our underlying similarities, can be revealed. How different are we from our ancestors who lived hundreds or thousands of years ago? Museum visits and exercises will allow students to engage with the material creations of these civilizations. CLST 123 is a non-technical introduction for students interested in archaeology, history, art history, anthropology, or related subjects. There are no prerequisites. The course fulfills the Cross Cultural Analysis foundational requirement.
                                                                          OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                          CLST 136-401 THE ANCIENT ECONOMY BOWES, KIMBERLY CLAIRE M. FAGIN HALL (NURSING 214 TR 1130AM-0100PM This class presents an introduction to economies before economics, a study of economic activity in the Greco-Roman world. Ancient Greece and Rome have been called some of the first "global" economies - they engaged in long-distance trade, introduced the first coinage systems, and built and manufactured at large scales. At the same time, they remained agrarian societies, with majority peasant populations, high levels of inequality and social systems that often placed social capital ahead of profit. Using textual sources, archaeology and techniques from the natural and social sciences, this class will not only look at basic elements of economic activity in the ancient world - demographics, trade, monetization, industry - but also ask critical questions about how - or if -modern economic methods can be applied to the distant past. No previous knowledge of the ancient world or economics is necessary.
                                                                            Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) STRUCTURED,ACTIVE,IN-CLASS LEARNING; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
                                                                            CLST 143-001 GREAT BOOKS GREECE/ROME TRAWEEK, ALISON WILLIAMS HALL 421 TR 0300PM-0430PM The literature of ancient Greece and Rome has been foundational for the national literatures of Europe and the Americas, and in the modern period it remains one of the most influential and widely read world literatures. This course introduces many of the most representative works that define the Greek and Roman canon from Homer to Augustine, along with the most characteristic issues that they examine. In the process, students will become familiar not only with the works themselves, but with the idea of a literary canon consisting of "great books," and will consider differing perspectives both on that idea and those of what constitutes a "foundational" or a "classical" literature, of literary influence, and of a community or culture defined in part by such a literature.
                                                                              Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR
                                                                              CLST 191-401 WORLD LITERATURE PREMOLI, MARTIN
                                                                              MIAN, ZAIN
                                                                              WILLIAMS HALL 29 M 0200PM-0500PM This course will introduce students to a wide array of literary works from across the world. It operates on the assumption that cultures have never been isolated from each other and that literature has always been in motion across national boundaries; it has been translated, adapted, and circulated. We will explore the genres, forms, and thematic preoccupations of major works that strive to imagine a wider world, while also studying the critical debates around the concept of world literature, from its origins with Goethe's essay on Weltliteratur to contemporary arguments about cosmopolitanism and globalization.
                                                                                CLST 211-401 ANCIENT MORAL PHILOSOPHY: GREEK AND ROMAN ETHICS MEYER, SUSAN CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 204 TR 1030AM-1200PM A survey of the ethical theories debated by philosophers in Classical Greece and Rome. Plato, Aristotle, Stoics, Epicureans and Pyrrhonist Sceptics offer competing answers to the fundamental question raised by Socrates: How are we to live? That is, what is the best life for a human being? These philosophers generally agree that virtue is an important part of the best human life, but disagree about whether it is the greatest good (Epicurus, for example claims that pleasure is the highest good), or whether there are any other goods (for example, health, wealth, family). Much attention is paid in their theories to accounts of the virtues of character, and to the place of wisdom in the best sort of human life.
                                                                                  Society sector (all classes) SOCIETY SECTOR
                                                                                  CLST 223-001 The Archaeology of Homers World TARTARON, THOMAS CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 392 MW 0430PM-0600PM Did you ever wonder what the world of the Iliad and Odyssey was really like? This illustrated lecture course surveys the prehistory and early history of the Greek world through texts and material remains, with the aim of bringing to life the society, economy, and politics of this ancient era. Among the topics are the rise and fall of the great Bronze Age civilizations of the Aegean area, the Minoans of Crete and the Mycenaeans of the Greek mainland; the cataclysmic volcanic eruption on the island of Thera (modern Santorini) and its long-term consequences; the Trojan War (myth or history??); the world of the Dark Age that followed the collapse of the Mycenaean palaces; and the Greek renaissance of the eighth century B.C. - including the adoption of the alphabet, the great colonizing movement, and the great Panhellenic sanctuaries like Olympia and Delphi - that laid the foundation for the Classical world to come. There are no prerequisites, and no prior knowledge of archaeology or the Greek world is assumed.
                                                                                    CLST 245-401 GREEK ARCH & URBANISM ZARMAKOUPI, MANTHA JAFFE BUILDING 113 TR 1030AM-1200PM As the locus of classical architecture and urbanism, the Greek world occupies an important place in the history of architecture and urbanism. This course explores the various periods and different moments of architectural creation during the first two millennia, from the palace complexes of Minoan Crete to the cities of the Hellenistic world (1600-100 BCE), and tackles major concepts, theories and practices of architectural and urban design. In studying a variety of sources - both ancient and modern - lectures examine concepts of organizing space, issues of structure, materials, decoration and proportion. The purpose of the course is to shed light on Greek architectural and urban projects within their social, political, religious, and physical contexts.
                                                                                      OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE
                                                                                      CLST 268-401 LVNG WRLD IN ARCH SCI: LIVING WORLD IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SCIENCE MOORE, KATHERINE
                                                                                      MONGE, JANET
                                                                                      WHITE, CHANTEL
                                                                                      UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 TR 1200PM-0130PM By focusing on the scientific analysis of archaeological remains, this course will explore life and death in the past. It takes place in the new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and is team taught in three modules: human skeletal analysis, analysis of animal remains, and analysis of plant remains. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how organic materials provide key information about past environments, human behavior, and cultural change through discussions of topics such as health and disease, inequality, and food.
                                                                                        OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO
                                                                                        CLST 271-401 GREEK & ROMAN MEDICINE ROSEN, RALPH JAFFE BUILDING B17 TR 0130PM-0300PM This course will examine the ways in which the Greeks, and then the Romans, conceptualized the body, disease, and healing, and will compare these to medical culture of our time. We will consider sources from Hippocrates, Plato, and Aristotle to Galen and Soranus, and will juxtapose these writings with modern discourse about similar topics. We will also pay some attention to ancient pharmacology and religious healing, and will visit the Penn Museum to see their collection of ancient medical instruments. All readings will be in English and no previous background in Classical Studies is required. This course will be especially appealing (and useful) to Pre-med and Nursing students, and to students interested in the History of Science, Ancient Philosophy, and Classics.
                                                                                          CLST 303-401 INTRODUCTION TO MUSEUMS BROWNLEE, DAVID
                                                                                          BROWNLEE, ANN
                                                                                          JAFFE BUILDING 113 T 0130PM-0430PM This course Presents an introduction to the history, theory and modern practice of museums. Using the resources of the University Museum, the course will introduce students to curatorial practice, education, exhibition design and conservation, while exploring the theoretical and ethical issues confronted by museums. Particularly relevant for those interested in archaeology, anthropology, art history, cultural heritage and public education.
                                                                                            OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE
                                                                                            CLST 315-401 KINSHIP AND CONNECTIVITY BRENT, LIANA WILLIAMS HALL 315 TR 0300PM-0430PM An individual's life course is often reflected, enhanced, and defined by their relations to other individuals. This course will investigate the concept of kinship in the Roman world through textual, visual, and archaeological evidence. We will explore relationships at all levels of society from the imperial family to the slaves and freedmen who were part of larger households, in order to understand how different relationships shaped and structured interactions in Roman society. Together, we will explore the following questions: how were relationships and bonds represented in the ancient world? What structures were in place for families to perpetuate themselves through biological or adoptive means? How could non-Roman citizens create family connections through formal and informal channels? How could relationships be celebrated in life and commemorated in death? We will use written evidence from ancient historians, visual evidence like the Altar of Peace, and archaeological evidence from cemeteries to examine how Roman notions of kinship shaped life and death in different social milieu.
                                                                                              CLST 316-401 AFRICA AND ROMAN LIT LEWIS, AMY PERELMAN CENTER FOR POLITICAL 100 TR 1200PM-0130PM In this course, we will explore race and ethnicity in the Roman world by focusing on the life and works of Roman Africans and the ways in which non-African Romans engaged with and presented the peoples of Africa. The course covers Roman literature in translation from the comedies of Plautus produced in the late 3rd - 2nd centuries BCE, to African Christian writing of the 5th century CE. It also covers a wide range of genres: we will examine how Roman writers articulate questions of race in comedy and satire, epic, history, biography, and elegy among others. We will read African writers (Apuleius, Augustine) and ask how their Africanness influences their works. We will read Roman accounts of journeys to Africa, wars with Africa, and encounters with Africans to ask how the Romans saw themselves as different from or similar to Africans. The course will also explore in more general terms how Romans talk about race: did racism exist? What aspects of different cultures and peoples did Romans choose to emphasize when they talked of non-Romans?
                                                                                                CLST 353-401 RHETORIC & THE COMMUNITY (SNF PAIDEIA PROGRAM COURSE) MCINERNEY, JEREMY WILLIAMS HALL 4 TR 0300PM-0430PM Rhetoric and the Community is a class designed to improve the quality of students' speaking abilities. Through debates, impromptu speeches and various other types of oral reports, students will develop their skills as speakers. The emphasis here is on practical advice, constant positive criticism and an active exploration of the art of oratory. We will emphasize the role of effective oral communication in contributing to a higher level of engagement and discourse in the community. This class will particularly help those planning careers in advocacy, public service, teaching and other areas where confident, thoughtful, and articulate communication are important.
                                                                                                  DESIGNATED SNF PAIDEIA PROGRAM COURSE; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                                                                  CLST 370-301 CLASSICS & AMER GOVT MULHERN, JOHN PSYCHOLOGY LAB C41 MW 0200PM-0330PM Before the universities established public-service programs in the twentieth century, many Americans prepared themselves for public life by studying Greek and Latin authors in school and college. In this course, using English translations, students survey an eighteenth-century classical curriculum and trace its influence in the political activity of Madison and others who guided the development of American governmental institutions.
                                                                                                    BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                                                                                    CLST 402-601 POST BACC GREEK KER, JAMES WILLIAMS HALL 633 MW 0100PM-0200PM Intensive Greek reading course for students in the Post-Baccalaureate Program in Classical Studies. Readings are chosen to expose students to a variety of prose and poetry texts during their program experience. The Fall course includes some grammar review and analysis as well as translation. Permission of instructor required for non-Post-Baccalaureate students.
                                                                                                      SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                                      CLST 402-602 RECITATION WILLIAMS HALL 633 F 0100PM-0200PM Intensive Greek reading course for students in the Post-Baccalaureate Program in Classical Studies. Readings are chosen to expose students to a variety of prose and poetry texts during their program experience. The Fall course includes some grammar review and analysis as well as translation. Permission of instructor required for non-Post-Baccalaureate students.
                                                                                                        SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                                        CLST 403-601 POST BACC LATIN NISHIMURA-JENSEN, JULIE CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 493 MW 1100AM-1200PM Intensive Latin reading course for students in the Post-Baccalaureate Program in Classical Studies. Readings are chosen to expose students to a variety of prose and poetry texts during their program experience. The Fall course includes some grammar review and analysis as well as translation. Permission of instructor required for non-Post-Baccalaureate students.
                                                                                                          SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                                          CLST 403-602 RECITATION BREECHER, SAMANTHA CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 493 F 1100AM-1200PM Intensive Latin reading course for students in the Post-Baccalaureate Program in Classical Studies. Readings are chosen to expose students to a variety of prose and poetry texts during their program experience. The Fall course includes some grammar review and analysis as well as translation. Permission of instructor required for non-Post-Baccalaureate students.
                                                                                                            SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                                            CLST 435-401 THE PAST PRESERVED: CONSERVATION IN ARCHAEOLOGY GRANT, LYNN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 T 0130PM-0430PM This course explores the scientific conservation of cultural materials from archaeological contexts. It is intended to familiarize students with the basics of artifact conservation but is not intended to train them as conservators. The course will cover how various materials interact with their deposit environments; general techniques for on-site conservation triage and retrieval of delicate materials; what factors need to be considered in planning for artifact conservation; and related topics. Students should expect to gain a thorough understanding of the role of conservation in archaeology and how the two fields interact.
                                                                                                              CLST 512-401 Petrography of Cultural Materials BOILEAU, MARIE-CLAUDE W 1000AM-0100PM Introduction to thin-section petrography of stone and ceramic archaeological materials. Using polarized light microscopy, the first half of this course will cover the basics of mineralogy and the petrography of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. The second half will focus on the petrographic description of ceramic materials, mainly pottery, with emphasis on the interpretation of provenance and technology. As part of this course, students will characterize and analyze archaeological samples from various collections. Prior knowledge of geology is not required.
                                                                                                                CLST 515-401 KINSHIP AND CONNECTIVITY BRENT, LIANA WILLIAMS HALL 315 TR 0300PM-0430PM An individual's life course is often reflected, enhanced, and defined by their relations to other individuals. This course will investigate the concept of kinship in the Roman world through textual, visual, and archaeological evidence. We will explore relationships at all levels of society from the imperial family to the slaves and freedmen who were part of larger households, in order to understand how different relationships shaped and structured interactions in Roman society. Together, we will explore the following questions: how were relationships and bonds represented in the ancient world? What structures were in place for families to perpetuate themselves through biological or adoptive means? How could non-Roman citizens create family connections through formal and informal channels? How could relationships be celebrated in life and commemorated in death? We will use written evidence from ancient historians, visual evidence like the Altar of Peace, and archaeological evidence from cemeteries to examine how Roman notions of kinship shaped life and death in different social milieu.
                                                                                                                  CLST 552-401 ARCHAEOMETALLURGY SEMINAR JANSEN, JAN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 F 0900AM-1200PM This course is designed to provide an in-depth analysis of archaeological metals. Topics to be discussed include: exploitation of ore and its transformation to metal in ancient times, distribution of metal as a raw materials, provenance studies, development and organization of early metallurgy, and interdisciplinary investigations of metals and related artifacts like slag and crucibles. Students will become familiar with the full spectrum of analytical procedures, ranging from microscopy for materials characterization to mass spectrometry for geochemical fingerprinting, and will work on individual research projects analyzing archaeological objects following the analytical methodology of archaeometallurgy.
                                                                                                                    UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                    CLST 568-401 LVNG WRLD IN ARCH SCI: LIVING WORLD IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SCIENCE MOORE, KATHERINE
                                                                                                                    MONGE, JANET
                                                                                                                    WHITE, CHANTEL
                                                                                                                    UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 TR 1200PM-0130PM By focusing on the scientific analysis of archaeological remains, this course will explore life and death in the past. It takes place in the new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and is team taught in three modules: human skeletal analysis, analysis of animal remains, and analysis of plant remains. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how organic materials provide key information about past environments, human behavior, and cultural change through discussions of topics such as health and disease, inequality, and food.
                                                                                                                      OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                      CLST 572-401 GEOPHYSICAL PROSPECTION FOR ARCHAEOLOGY HERRMANN, JASON UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 W 0200PM-0500PM Near-surface geophysical prospection methods are now widely used in archaeology as they allow archaeologists to rapidly map broad areas, minimize or avoid destructive excavation, and perceive physical dimensions of archaeological features that are outside of the range of human perception. This course will cover the theory of geophysical sensors commonly used in archaeological investigations and the methods for collecting, processing, and interpreting geophysical data from archaeological contexts. We will review the physical properties of common archaeological and paleoenvironmental targets, the processes that led to their deposition and formation, and how human activity is reflected in anomalies recorded through geophysical survey through lectures, readings, and discussion. Students will gain experience collecting data in the field with various sensors at archaeological sites in the region. A large proportion of the course will be computer-based as students work with data from geophysical sensors, focusing on the fundamentals of data processing, data fusion, and interpretation. Some familiarity with GIS is recommended.
                                                                                                                        UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                        CLST 604-401 GREEK TROY MURNAGHAN, SHEILA
                                                                                                                        ROSE, CHARLES
                                                                                                                        CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203 T 0200PM-0500PM An interdisciplinary seminar focusing on the city of Troy both as an archaeological site and as the setting of the legendary Trojan War. We will consider Homer's Iliad (with selected sections read in Greek) together with the topography and archaeology of the site of Troy in order to address a series of interrelated questions: What are the points of continuity and discontinuity between the stories told by the literary tradition and the material record? How do both types of evidence contribute to our understanding of political relations and cultural interactions between Greece and Anatolia in the Bronze Age? How do Hittite sources bear on our reconstruction of the events behind the Troy legend? How have the site and the poem contributed to each other's interpretation in the context of scholarly discovery and debate? We will give some attention to modern receptions of the Troy legend that deliberately combine material and textual elements, such as Cy Twombly's "Fifty Days at Iliam" and Alice Oswald's "Memorial: An Excavation of Homer's Iliad." The seminar will include a visit to the site of Troy during the Spring Break.
                                                                                                                          CLST 610-401 CLSL RECEPTION MIDAGES: MEDIEVAL PERFORMANCES STEINER, EMILY FISHER-BENNETT HALL 222 T 0900AM-1200PM This seminar will study a number of selected Middle English texts in depth. Attention will be paid to the textual transmission, sources, language, genre, and structure of the works. Larger issues, such as the influence of literary conventions (for example, "courtly love"), medieval rhetoric, or medieval allegory will be explored as the chosen texts may require.
                                                                                                                            CLST 612-401 THE FLAVIAN ERA WILKER, JULIA
                                                                                                                            DAMON, CYNTHIA
                                                                                                                            CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 337 R 0100PM-0400PM The time of the Flavians (69-96 BCE) holds a special place in Roman history and culture as it marks the transition from the Julio-Claudian period to the High Empire. Historically, the rule of Rome's second dynasty saw a stabilization of the imperial power system, the consolidation of social and political hierarchies, and an increasing integration of the empire. Major construction projects reshaped the city of Rome, topographically and ideologically. The literary production in various genres reached a new peak, developed new forms, and explored new topics. The unusually high number of Greek and Latin texts and documents preserved allow us to analyze such changes closely; our focus will be on the interrelation and conjunction of these developments. Final projects will take the form of papers suitable for presentation at the SCS Annual Meeting.
                                                                                                                              CLST 698-401 PROSPECTUS WORKSHOP FARRELL, JOSEPH FISHER-BENNETT HALL 25 T 0900AM-1200PM Designed to prepare graduates in any aspect of study in the ancient world to prepare for the dissertation prospectus. Course will be centered around individual presentations and group critique of prospectus' in process, as well the fundamentals of large-project research design and presentation.
                                                                                                                                PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                                                                                GREK 018-680 INTERMED MODERN GREEK II NIKOLAOU, GEORGIA WILLIAMS HALL 302 MW 0530PM-0700PM Further attention to developing oral expression, reading, and writing skills for students with knowledge of Demotic Modern Greek. Offered through Penn Language Center.
                                                                                                                                  LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                  GREK 102-301 ELEM CLASSICAL GREEK II NISHIMURA-JENSEN, JULIE CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 237 MWF 0100PM-0200PM Students complete their study of the morphology and syntax of Classical Greek. We begin the semester with continuing exercises in grammar and translation, then gradually shift emphasis to reading unadapted Greek texts.
                                                                                                                                    LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                    GREK 204-301 INTERMED GREEK: POETRY MURNAGHAN, SHEILA CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 237 TR 1200PM-0130PM An introduction to the reading, interpretation, and translation of Greek poetryand Homeric Greek through close attention to sections of Homer's Iliad.
                                                                                                                                      SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                                                                                                                                      GREK 310-401 THUCYDIDES MCINERNEY, JEREMY WILLIAMS HALL 305 TR 1030AM-1200PM In this class we will read excerpts from the Greek historian, Thucydides, whose account of the Peloponnesian War is one of the most influential and compelling examples of history writing from any culture. Thucydides is generally thought of as one of the more difficult Greek prose authors. We will read some basic narrative passages in order to become familiar with Thucydidean style, before moving to the more difficult speeches and editorial passages in which Thucydides expounds upon the goals and difficulties of writing history.
                                                                                                                                        GREK 541-301 GREEK LITERARY HISTORY ROSEN, RALPH FISHER-BENNETT HALL 222 W 0200PM-0500PM Through selected readings from both poetry and prose, we will survey the range and evolution of ancient Greek literary practice.
                                                                                                                                          GREK 604-401 GREEK TROY MURNAGHAN, SHEILA
                                                                                                                                          ROSE, CHARLES
                                                                                                                                          CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203 T 0200PM-0500PM An interdisciplinary seminar focusing on the city of Troy both as an archaeological site and as the setting of the legendary Trojan War. We will consider Homer's Iliad (with selected sections read in Greek) together with the topography and archaeology of the site of Troy in order to address a series of interrelated questions: What are the points of continuity and discontinuity between the stories told by the literary tradition and the material record? How do both types of evidence contribute to our understanding of political relations and cultural interactions between Greece and Anatolia in the Bronze Age? How do Hittite sources bear on our reconstruction of the events behind the Troy legend? How have the site and the poem contributed to each other's interpretation in the context of scholarly discovery and debate? We will give some attention to modern receptions of the Troy legend that deliberately combine material and textual elements, such as Cy Twombly's "Fifty Days at Iliam" and Alice Oswald's "Memorial: An Excavation of Homer's Iliad." The seminar will include a visit to the site of Troy during the Spring Break.
                                                                                                                                            GREK 610-401 THUCYDIDES MCINERNEY, JEREMY WILLIAMS HALL 305 TR 1030AM-1200PM In this class we will read excerpts from the Greek historian, Thucydides, whose account of the Peloponnesian War is one of the most influential and compelling examples of history writing from any culture. Thucydides is generally thought of as one of the more difficult Greek prose authors. We will read some basic narrative passages in order to become familiar with Thucydidean style, before moving to the more difficult speeches and editorial passages in which Thucydides expounds upon the goals and difficulties of writing history.
                                                                                                                                              LATN 102-301 ELEMENTARY LATIN II ELLIOTT, ZACHARY CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203 MWF 1000AM-1100AM Prerequisite(s): LATN 101 or equivalent. Completes the introduction to the Latin language begun in 101. By the end of the course students will have a complete working knowledge of Latin grammar, a growing vocabulary, and experience in reading simple continuous texts.
                                                                                                                                                LATN 102-302 ELEMENTARY LATIN II MACKEY, DANIEL CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 237 MWF 1100AM-1200PM Prerequisite(s): LATN 101 or equivalent. Completes the introduction to the Latin language begun in 101. By the end of the course students will have a complete working knowledge of Latin grammar, a growing vocabulary, and experience in reading simple continuous texts.
                                                                                                                                                  LATN 204-301 INTERMED LATIN: POETRY TRAWEEK, ALISON DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 4C2 MW 0430PM-0600PM Prerequisite(s): LATN 203 or equivalent (such as placement score of 600). Continuous reading of several Latin authors in poetry (e.g., Ovid, Virgil, Horace) as well as some more complex prose, in combination with ongoing review of Latin grammar. By the end of the course students will have thorough familiarity with the grammar, vocabulary, and style and style of the selected authors, will be able to tackle previously unseen passages by them, and will be able to discuss language and interpretation. Note: Completion of Latin 204 with C- or higher fulfills Penn's Foreign Language Requirement.
                                                                                                                                                    SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                                                                                                                                                    LATN 204-302 INTERMED LATIN: POETRY SOLLEY, NATHANIEL DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 3N6 MWF 1100AM-1200PM Prerequisite(s): LATN 203 or equivalent (such as placement score of 600). Continuous reading of several Latin authors in poetry (e.g., Ovid, Virgil, Horace) as well as some more complex prose, in combination with ongoing review of Latin grammar. By the end of the course students will have thorough familiarity with the grammar, vocabulary, and style and style of the selected authors, will be able to tackle previously unseen passages by them, and will be able to discuss language and interpretation. Note: Completion of Latin 204 with C- or higher fulfills Penn's Foreign Language Requirement.
                                                                                                                                                      SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                                                                                                                                                      LATN 204-303 INTERMED LATIN: POETRY ESPANOL ANDROUTSOPOULOS, ODYSSEAS CASTER BUILDING A14 MWF 1000AM-1100AM Prerequisite(s): LATN 203 or equivalent (such as placement score of 600). Continuous reading of several Latin authors in poetry (e.g., Ovid, Virgil, Horace) as well as some more complex prose, in combination with ongoing review of Latin grammar. By the end of the course students will have thorough familiarity with the grammar, vocabulary, and style and style of the selected authors, will be able to tackle previously unseen passages by them, and will be able to discuss language and interpretation. Note: Completion of Latin 204 with C- or higher fulfills Penn's Foreign Language Requirement.
                                                                                                                                                        SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                                                                                                                                                        LATN 310-301 SENECA FARRELL, JOSEPH WILLIAMS HALL 6 TR 0130PM-0300PM Seneca was the most important writer of Latin in the early imperial period. In addition to poetry, satire, and natural philosophy, he wrote ethical philosophy in the form of letters, dialogues, and essays. His works "On the Brevity of Life" and "On Leisure" speak both the ethical issues of his own time and those of many others, including our own. In this course we will read both these essays with the goals of becoming familiar with Seneca's thought and style of expression, both as an individual and as a writer representative of his age. Students will have the opportunity to respond to Seneca in the form of critical essays, essayistic or epistolary responses, or other forms of their choosing.