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TABLE
Form: Gr. trapeza; Lat. mensa.
Tables served in ancient times only for the support of vessels necessary for meals; not (as with us) for writing and reading as well. As the couches on which people reclined at meal-times were not high, the tables were mostly lower than ours. Some were quadrangular and had four legs (fig. 1); this was for a long time the only form customary among the Romans. Others had circular or oval tops, and rested either on one leg or (more frequently) on three, to which the shape of animals' feet was given by preference (figs. 2, 3). The Greeks set a high value on the artistic adornment of their tables; but the Roman love of display expended more money on these articles of furniture than on any other. The feet were wrought in the finest metal, ivory, or stone work. The construction of the top of the table was a matter of special luxury. It was composed either of the nobler metals, rare kinds of stone, or costly varieties of wood. Especially costly were the monopodia or orbes, tables resting on one leg, with the wooden top cut out of a single log in the whole of its diameter. The most expensive and most sought-after wood was that of the citrus, an evergreen growing in the Atlas Mountains (which has been identified with the cypress, or juniper). The price of these mensoe citreoe, which were generally supported by one ivory leg, varied according to the dimensions of the diameter, which were sometimes as much as four feet and also according to the beauty of the grain, which was brought out by polish. The prices named for single specimens of such tables ranged from £5,438 to £15,226 [Pliny, N. H., xiii 92,96,102]. On account of the costliness of this kind of wood, the tops were sometimes made of some common material, especially maple, and covered over with a veneer of citrus. The small abacus served as a sideboard. Its square top, which was generally furnished with a raised rim, rested on one support (trapezophoron) which was made of marble, bronze, or silver, and lent itself readily to sculptural treatment. Another kind of ornamental table was the delphica, in the form of a Greek tripod with a round top. Tables were also included in the ordinary furniture of a temple, especially such as stood directly in front of the statue of the god, and on which were laid the offerings not intended to be burnt. (See SACRIFICES, figs. 1, 2.)

Pictures and Media
TABLES.
TABLES.
TABLES.
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gutter splint
gutter splint
PLACE HOLDER FOR COUNTER
gutter splint