CLST7317 - Ruins and Reconstruction

Status
A
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Ruins and Reconstruction
Term
2024C
Subject area
CLST
Section number only
401
Section ID
CLST7317401
Course number integer
7317
Meeting times
W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM
Level
graduate
Instructors
Lynn M. Meskell
Description
This class examines our enduring fascination with ruins coupled with our commitments to reconstruction from theoretical, ethical, socio-political and practical perspectives. This includes analyzing international conventions and principles, to the work of heritage agencies and NGOs, to the implications for specific local communities and development trajectories. We will explore global case studies featuring archaeological and monumental sites with an attention to context and communities, as well as the construction of expertise and implications of international intervention. Issues of conservation from the material to the digital will also be examined. Throughout the course we will be asking what a future in ruins holds for a variety of fields and disciplines, as well as those who have most to win or lose in the preservation of the past.
Course number only
7317
Cross listings
ANTH5805401, HSPV5850401, MELC5950401
Use local description
No

CLST1208 - Ancient Women's Voices from Homer to Hadestown

Status
A
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
301
Title (text only)
Ancient Women's Voices from Homer to Hadestown
Term
2024C
Subject area
CLST
Section number only
301
Section ID
CLST1208301
Course number integer
1208
Meeting times
T 5:15 PM-8:14 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Jordan Carrick
Description
“We may call Eurydice forth from the world of the dead, but we cannot make her answer.” Such is the challenge, as described by Margaret Atwood, that faces a scholar of historically marginalized groups. Most of our knowledge about the lives of ancient Greek and Roman women comes from male sources, from which we imagine a female perspective. But what about when these figures have speaking roles? Are they still voiceless? This course provides an introductory survey of ancient Greek and Roman literary and dramatic texts which feature women as voiced (speaking) subjects. Readings will include excerpts in translation from Homeric epic, tragedy, Greek and Roman comedy, Vergil’s Aeneid, and Ovid. We will also consider the poetry of two ancient women, Sulpicia and Sappho. Can we assume that they represent more authentic experiences? Are these voices just as artificial and literary as their male-authored counterparts? We will also consider modern reimaginings of ancient women’s voices which offer new ways to reclaim, reframe, and problematize the "Classical" canon; these texts include Madeline Miller’s “Circe”, Nina Maclaughlin’s “Wake, Siren”, and the musical “Hadestown”. As we consider the voices of ancient figures, students will have the opportunity to develop their own through various critical speaking assignments. This course is offered as a Communication Within the Curriculum seminar, and no prior knowledge is required.
Course number only
1208
Use local description
No

ANCH0102 - Ancient Rome

Status
A
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
920
Title (text only)
Ancient Rome
Term session
2
Term
2024B
Syllabus URL
Subject area
ANCH
Section number only
920
Section ID
ANCH0102920
Course number integer
102
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Maddalena Scarperi
Description
At its furthest extent during the second century CE, the Roman Empire was truly a "world empire", stretching from northern Britain to North Africa and Egypt, encompassing the whole of Asia Minor, and bordering the Danube in its route from the Black Forest region of Germany to the Black Sea. But in its earliest history it comprised a few small hamlets on a collection of hills adjacent to the Tiber river in central Italy. Over a period of nearly 1500 years, the Roman state transformed from a mythical Kingdom to a Republic dominated by a heterogeneous, competitive aristocracy to an Empire ruled, at least notionally, by one man. It developed complex legal and administrative structures, supported a sophisticated and highly successful military machine, and sustained elaborate systems of economic production and exchange. It was, above all, a society characterized both by a willingness to include newly conquered peoples in the project of empire, and by fundamental, deep-seated practices of social exclusion and domination. This course focuses in particular upon the history of the Roman state between the fifth century BCE and the third century CE, exploring its religious and cultural practices, political, social and economic structures. It also scrutinizes the fundamental tensions and enduring conflicts that characterized this society throughout this 800-year period.
Course number only
0102
Cross listings
CLST0102920, HIST0721920
Fulfills
Cross Cultural Analysis
History & Tradition Sector
Use local description
No

ANCH0101 - Ancient Greece

Status
A
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
910
Title (text only)
Ancient Greece
Term session
1
Term
2024B
Syllabus URL
Subject area
ANCH
Section number only
910
Section ID
ANCH0101910
Course number integer
101
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Matthew Reichelt
Description
The Greeks enjoy a special place in the construction of western culture and identity, and yet many of us have only the vaguest notion of what their culture was like. A few Greek myths at bedtime when we are kids, maybe a Greek tragedy like Sophokles' Oidipous when we are at school: these are often the only contact we have with the world of the ancient Mediterranean. The story of the Greeks, however, deserves a wider audience, because so much of what we esteem in our own culture derives from them: democracy, epic poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, history writing, philosophy, aesthetic taste, all of these and many other features of cultural life enter the West from Greece. The oracle of Apollo at Delphi had inscribed over the temple, "Know Thyself." For us, that also means knowing the Greeks. We will cover the period from the Late Bronze Age, c. 1500 BC, down to the time of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the two hundred year interval from 600-400 BC.
Course number only
0101
Cross listings
CLST0101910, HIST0720910
Fulfills
History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Use local description
No

CLST7710 - MLA Proseminar: Premodern Animals

Status
A
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
940
Title (text only)
MLA Proseminar: Premodern Animals
Term session
S
Term
2024B
Subject area
CLST
Section number only
940
Section ID
CLST7710940
Course number integer
7710
Level
graduate
Instructors
Emily R Steiner
Description
From St. Cuthbert, whose freezing feet were warmed by otters, to St. Guinefort, a miracle-performing greyhound in 13th-century France, to Melusine, the half-fish, half-woman ancestress of the house of Luxembourg (now the Starbucks logo), medieval narratives are deeply inventive in their portrayal of human-animal interactions. This course introduces students to critical animals studies via medieval literature and culture. We will read a range of genres, from philosophical commentaries on Aristotle and theological commentaries on Noah’s ark to werewolf poems, beast fables, political satires, saints’ lives, chivalric romances, bestiaries, natural encyclopaedias, dietary treatises and travel narratives.
Among the many topics we will explore are the following: animals in premodern law; comfort and companion animals; vegetarianism across religious cultures; animal symbolism and human virtue; taxonomies of species in relation to race, gender, and class; literary animals and political subversion; menageries and collecting across medieval Europe, the Near East, and Asia; medieval notions of hybridity, compositeness, trans-species identity, and interspecies relationships; art and the global traffic in animals (e.g., ivory, parchment); European encounters with New World animals; and the legacy of medieval animals in contemporary philosophy and media.
No prior knowledge of medieval literature is required. Students from all disciplines are welcome.
Course number only
7710
Cross listings
COML5245940, ENGL5245940, RELS6101940
Use local description
No

CLST3402 - Hellenistic and Roman Art and Artifact

Status
A
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
920
Title (text only)
Hellenistic and Roman Art and Artifact
Term session
2
Term
2024B
Subject area
CLST
Section number only
920
Section ID
CLST3402920
Course number integer
3402
Meeting times
TR 12:00 PM-3:59 PM
Meeting location
COHN 392
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Stephanie Anne Hagan
Description
This lecture course surveys the political, religious and domestic arts, patronage and display in Rome's Mediterranean, from the 2nd c. BCE to Constantine's 4th-c. Christianized empire. Our subjects are images and decorated objects in their cultural, political and socio-economic contexts (painting, mosaic, sculpture, luxury and mass-produced arts in many media). We start with the Hellenistic cosmopolitan culture of the Greek kingdoms and their neighbors, and late Etruscan and Republican Italy; next we map Imperial Roman art as developed around the capital city Rome, as well as in the provinces of the vast empire.
Course number only
3402
Cross listings
ARTH2260920
Fulfills
Cross Cultural Analysis
Use local description
No

CLST1701 - Scandalous Arts in Ancient and Modern Communities

Status
A
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
920
Title (text only)
Scandalous Arts in Ancient and Modern Communities
Term session
2
Term
2024B
Syllabus URL
Subject area
CLST
Section number only
920
Section ID
CLST1701920
Course number integer
1701
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Jordan Carrick
Description
What do the ancient Greek comedian Aristophanes, the Roman satirist Juvenal, have in common with rappers Snoop Dogg and Eminem? Many things, in fact, but perhaps most fundamental is their delight in shocking audiences and upending social norms. This course will examine the various arts (including literary, visual and musical media) that transgress the boundaries of taste and convention in ancient Greco-Roman culture and our own era. We will consider, among other topics, why communities feel compelled to repudiate some forms of scandalous art, while turning others - especially those that have come down to us from remote historical periods - into so-called classics.
Course number only
1701
Cross listings
COML1701920
Fulfills
Humanties & Social Science Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Use local description
No

CLST1602 - World Literature

Status
X
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
921
Title (text only)
World Literature
Term session
2
Term
2024B
Subject area
CLST
Section number only
921
Section ID
CLST1602921
Course number integer
1602
Meeting times
CANCELED
Level
undergraduate
Description
How do we think 'the world' as such? Globalizing economic paradigms encourage one model that, while it connects distant regions with the ease of a finger-tap, also homogenizes the world, manufacturing patterns of sameness behind simulations of diversity. Our current world-political situation encourages another model, in which fundamental differences are held to warrant the consolidation of borders between Us and Them, "our world" and "theirs." This course begins with the proposal that there are other ways to encounter the world, that are politically compelling, ethically important, and personally enriching--and that the study of literature can help tease out these new paths. Through the idea of World Literature, this course introduces students to the appreciation and critical analysis of literary texts, with the aim of navigating calls for universality or particularity (and perhaps both) in fiction and film. "World literature" here refers not merely to the usual definition of "books written in places other than the US and Europe, "but any form of cultural production that explores and pushes at the limits of a particular world, that steps between and beyond worlds, or that heralds the coming of new worlds still within us, waiting to be born. And though, as we read and discuss our texts, we will glide about in space and time from the inner landscape of a private mind to the reaches of the farthest galaxies, knowledge of languages other than English will not be required, and neither will any prior familiary with the literary humanities. In the company of drunken kings, botanical witches, ambisexual alien lifeforms, and storytellers who've lost their voice, we will reflect on, and collectively navigate, our encounters with the faraway and the familiar--and thus train to think through the challenges of concepts such as translation, narrative, and ideology. Texts include Kazuo Ishiguro, Ursula K. LeGuin, Salman Rushdie, Werner Herzog, Jamaica Kincaid, Russell Hoban, Hiroshi Teshigahara, Arundhathi Roy, and Abbas Kiarostami.
Course number only
1602
Cross listings
COML1191921, ENGL1179921
Use local description
No

CLST1602 - World Literature

Status
A
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
920
Title (text only)
World Literature
Term session
2
Term
2024B
Subject area
CLST
Section number only
920
Section ID
CLST1602920
Course number integer
1602
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Akhil Puthiyadath Veetil
Description
How do we think 'the world' as such? Globalizing economic paradigms encourage one model that, while it connects distant regions with the ease of a finger-tap, also homogenizes the world, manufacturing patterns of sameness behind simulations of diversity. Our current world-political situation encourages another model, in which fundamental differences are held to warrant the consolidation of borders between Us and Them, "our world" and "theirs." This course begins with the proposal that there are other ways to encounter the world, that are politically compelling, ethically important, and personally enriching--and that the study of literature can help tease out these new paths. Through the idea of World Literature, this course introduces students to the appreciation and critical analysis of literary texts, with the aim of navigating calls for universality or particularity (and perhaps both) in fiction and film. "World literature" here refers not merely to the usual definition of "books written in places other than the US and Europe, "but any form of cultural production that explores and pushes at the limits of a particular world, that steps between and beyond worlds, or that heralds the coming of new worlds still within us, waiting to be born. And though, as we read and discuss our texts, we will glide about in space and time from the inner landscape of a private mind to the reaches of the farthest galaxies, knowledge of languages other than English will not be required, and neither will any prior familiary with the literary humanities. In the company of drunken kings, botanical witches, ambisexual alien lifeforms, and storytellers who've lost their voice, we will reflect on, and collectively navigate, our encounters with the faraway and the familiar--and thus train to think through the challenges of concepts such as translation, narrative, and ideology. Texts include Kazuo Ishiguro, Ursula K. LeGuin, Salman Rushdie, Werner Herzog, Jamaica Kincaid, Russell Hoban, Hiroshi Teshigahara, Arundhathi Roy, and Abbas Kiarostami.
Course number only
1602
Cross listings
COML1191920, ENGL1179920
Use local description
No

CLST1600 - Dangerous Books of Antiquity

Status
A
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
910
Title (text only)
Dangerous Books of Antiquity
Term session
1
Term
2024B
Subject area
CLST
Section number only
910
Section ID
CLST1600910
Course number integer
1600
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Samantha M Taylor
Description
All books, even those regarded by some as "classics", are potentially dangerous. This course will survey a selection of ancient books that got their authors in trouble, were censored, inspired rebellion, or enabled social (and antisocial) movements, down to the present moment. Most of the books read will come from ancient Greece or Rome, but some will come from other ancient cultures, such as Egypt, the Near East, and China. Issues involved will include atheism, race and ethnicity, sex and gender, nationalism, magic, and mysticism. The course will make use of brief lectures and presentations but leave as much time as possible for seminar-style discussion.
Course number only
1600
Fulfills
Arts & Letters Sector
Use local description
No